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Slip-Resistant Shoes Help Lower Restaurant Insurance Costs

Posted by David Ross on Sat, Jul 04, 2020

slip-resistant shoes can lower restaurant insurance costsIf you want to lower Restaurant Insurance costs, a comprehensive safety plan is essential. A well-designed and enforced safety program helps minimize the number of injuries. This results in fewer insurance claims, which lowers your insurance costs and provides numerous other benefits, such as improved employee morale and productivity.

But where should you begin with a safety program?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, slips, trips, and falls are the third most common type of work-related injury in the US and the second most common fatal work-related injury. While falling from a higher level resulted in more work-related fatalities, injuries caused by falls on the same level occur more often in restaurants and can cause injury. In fact, the BLS reports that half of all falls from the same level ended in more than ten days away from work.

The most common injuries in same-level falls include sprains, strains, dislocations, and tears to the lower extremities, which are the most expensive category of injuries, costing almost $13 million in Workers’ Compensation costs every year.

So, there’s your answer as to where to begin! Start your safety program by minimizing the risk of falls. Here’s information about one simple step – providing slip-resistant shoes - that can help significantly decrease slip, trip, and fall injuries in your restaurant.

The Study

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Laboratory studies of slip-resistant footwear to reduce slips, trips, and falls have shown promise in reducing slips, but limited field research made it difficult to demonstrate if slip-resistant footwear actually reduced injuries.”

So, researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) evaluated 17,000 food-service workers in 226 school districts across the US to determine the effectiveness of a program that provided highly-rated slip-resistant shoes at no cost to the workers. The researchers wanted to see if this type of program would reduce WC injury claims related to slipping on greasy or wet floors.

Workers in some of the school districts in the study wore 5-star rated slip-resistant shoes that were given to them at no cost, and workers in other districts wore their own slip-resistant shoes. The shoes provided were designed specifically to prevent slips on greasy or wet floors.

The Results

The districts where workers were provided slip-resistant shoes experienced a 67% reduction in claims for slip injuries. The baseline measure was 3.54 slipping injuries per 10,000 months worked, which was reduced to 1.18 slipping injuries per 10,000 months worked during the time when workers wore slip-resistant shoes that were provided at no cost.

The other districts where workers were not given slip-resistant shoes did not experience any decline in slip injuries.

The study also found that – prior to the study - workers over the age of 55 had a higher probability of a slip-related WC claim (4.2 injuries per 10,000 worker months) than workers under the age of 55 (2.3 injuries per 10,000 worker months). Therefore, as the number of workers over the age of 55 remain active in the US workforce, preventing slipping injuries becomes even more vital if businesses want to keep Workers’ Compensation costs down.

The CDC concluded, “The findings from this study provide evidence of the effectiveness of slip-resistant footwear and may assist employers, managers, and workers in their decision on whether to invest time and resources in a slip-resistant footwear program.”

Additional Tips to Lower Your Restaurant Insurance Costs

American Insuring Group specializes in Restaurant Insurance and is focused on providing the best insurance coverage at the best price. Discover more safety tips on our blog and give us a call today at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online to discover how we can help you save even more on your Restaurant Insurance costs!

Tags: Restaurant Insurance, workers comp costs, Safety Programs, Restaurant Safety, Restaurant Insurance Costs

Workplace Ergonomics Minimizes Injury and Lowers WC Costs

Posted by David Ross on Sat, Jun 27, 2020

Workplace ergonomics can impact Workers Compensation Insurance costs in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Reading, Lancaster, Erie, PA and throughout the US. We often focus on minimizing Workers’ Compensation Insurance costs in potentially dangerous workplaces such as restaurants and construction sites: however, office spaces are not immune to workplace injuries.

One of the most significant work-related injuries in an office are musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). According to OSHA, “Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are the most widespread occupational health hazard facing our Nation today.” Every year, almost two million workers suffer from work-related MSDs, and approximately 600,000 of those workers lose time from work due to the MSD.

OSHA estimates the direct cost of MSDs to be between $15 and $20 billion every year, with total yearly costs in the $45 to $54 billion range. Plus, $1 out of every $3 spent on WC is a result of insufficient ergonomic protection, which can help avoid MSDs.

What Are Musculoskeletal Disorders?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of the Department of Labor describes MSDs as “musculoskeletal system and connective tissue diseases and disorders when the event or exposure leading to the case is bodily reaction (e.g., bending, climbing, crawling, reaching, twisting), overexertion, or repetitive motion.” MSDs affect joints, bones, muscles, the spine, etc. Examples of MSDs include carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, degenerative disc disease, and tension neck syndrome.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes work-related MSDs as conditions in which “the work environment and performance of work contribute significantly to the condition; and/or the condition is made worse or persists longer due to work conditions.”

What is Workplace Ergonomics?

Workplace ergonomics - the science of fitting a job to a person so that they can work safely, without injury or pain - can help prevent MSDs, thereby reducing workplace injury and reducing Workers’ Comp and other expenses. A bonus is that it can actually improve a worker’s productivity.

Often, a few simple adjustments can make a huge difference, and it doesn’t have to cost a lot.

Ergonomics in the Office

Occupational Health & Safety reports that workers spend an average of 1,700 hours per year in front of a computer screen. That’s more than 70 days every year sitting at a desk. Sitting in the same position for long periods of time can cause pain and injury and lead to MSDs. Many office workers don’t even realize that they are sitting in awkward postures that can affect their health and safety.

Here are some of the most common ergonomic problems in an office:

  • Monitors are too low, which forces flexion of the cervical spine.
  • Armrests are not used properly or not at all, which can cause tensions in the neck, shoulders, and trapezius muscles.
  • The mouse is not aligned with the shoulder, which can cause pain in the neck, wrist, and upper limbs.
  • Workers use phones without a headset, which can cause pain in the shoulder and spine.

Here are some tips to improve office ergonomics:

  • An office chair should allow for height adjustment so that the worker can sit with his or her knees at a 90-degree angle. It should also have adequate lumbar support and armrests, so elbows are at a 90-degree angle.
  • The desk and chair should allow enough space for the user to cross their legs. Users should be able to rest their feet flat on the floor, so use a footrest if needed.
  • Pad the edges of the desk if there are hard edges.
  • A monitor should be placed, so the top is at or just below eye level and is an arm’s length away. The brightest light source should be to the side to avoid glare.
  • The mouse should be directly in line with the shoulder, so the wrist remains straight.
  • The height of the keyboard should allow the user to keep their wrists straight while typing.
  • A phone should be held in one hand, or the user should use a headset.

MyAbilities offers a tool called Rapid Office Strain Assessment (ROSA), which is a self-guided self-assessment that shows workers how to adjust their workstation to prevent discomfort and injury.

Want to Save Even More on Workers’ Compensation?

Creating safe workplaces to avoid injuries is the best way to reduce WC costs. Another way to save on all commercial insurance costs is to work with one of the independent agents at American Insuring Group who specialize in Workers’ Compensation Insurance. Give us a call today at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online to see how we can help you save on your Workers’ Compensation and other insurance costs.

Tags: Workers Compensation Insurance, workers comp, PA Workers Compensation Insurance, workers comp costs, Safety Programs

Marijuana and Contractors Insurance

Posted by David Ross on Sat, Jun 20, 2020

Marijuana and the impact on contractors insuranceMore than four years after Governor Tom Wolf signed the Pennsylvania Medical Marijuana Act into law, the implications of the law on construction site safety and Contractors Insurance is still unclear. Pennsylvania was the 24th state to legalize medical marijuana, and today, nearly thirty states have similar laws.

The challenge for construction companies is balancing safety with compliance with a variety of conflicting state and federal laws regarding the use of both recreational and medical marijuana.

According to the National Safety Council (NSC), “While medical marijuana-using employees have mounted legal challenges, state statutes usually side with employers who reject potential employees or reprimand workers that test positive for cannabis, even if they have a medical marijuana card. Some states protect employee rights and safeguard against disciplinary action for medical marijuana use, however. Marijuana is still illegal according to federal law, which classifies it as a Schedule I drug with no accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. Federal law supersedes state law.”

NSC also states that the Americans with Disabilities Acts sides with employers, most states will not pay worker compensation benefits to an employee who is under the influence at the time of the accident, and most state health insurance programs won’t pay for medical marijuana.

Putting legal and ethical issues aside, the bottom line is that marijuana use can impact job safety, and in an industry already fraught with its share of hazards, safety should be a priority for any construction site. Workplace injuries not only increase Workers’ Compensation Insurance costs they also decrease employee productivity and morale.

Marijuana and Job-Site Safety

Marijuana contains tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a psychoactive compound, which has shown to have adverse effects. It can change a person’s sensory perception, create short-term memory problems, and impair thinking. Physically, marijuana use has been shown to impair motor skills, cause a loss of balance and coordination, and impair depth perception. These effects can prove deadly to someone driving a forklift or working on a roof.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, “employees who tested positive for marijuana on a pre-employment urine drug test had 55% more industrial accidents, 85% more injuries, and 75% greater absenteeism compared with those who tested negative for marijuana use.”

What Can Construction Companies Do?

While much of the Pennsylvania Medical Marijuana Act is unclear – or even conflicting - some sections support employers and workplace safety. For example, if an employee has more than ten nanograms of THC in their blood, they cannot operate or be in physical control of strong chemicals or high voltage electricity and that an employee who is “under the influence of medical marijuana” cannot perform duties in confined spaces or at heights.” It also states that an employer can prohibit an employee from “performing any task which the employer deems life-threatening, to either the employee or any of the employees of the employer.”

If you are working on a federal project, you have no choice but to maintain a drug-free job site, and the use of marijuana on the job should always be prohibited on any job site.

The NSC recommends that construction companies have a drug-testing program and a solid drug policy in place that include the following:

  • A definition of the terms “marijuana,” “cannabis,” or any other derivation
  • Proper management and supervisor training
  • Access to support for employees with drug addictions
  • Clearly defined use and possession parameters
  • Drug testing policies and procedures – Tests should be conducted uniformly for all employees to avoid liability for discrimination claims.
  • Education for employees on clinical issues relating to marijuana, such as how long it remains in the system, the effects it can have, including the potential impact on workplace safety.
  • Established rules for post-accident testing
  • Rules on how to handle employee convictions or arrests
  • A reminder that on-the-job impairment will not be tolerated, including medical marijuana

Include your drug policy in all recruiting and new-hire on-boarding materials. Review your drug policy with a lawyer and update it as laws change.

Here's How to Save on Contractors Insurance!

Creating a safe worksite is just one way to lower Contractors Insurance rates. Working with one of the American Insuring Group independent agents who specialize in Contractors Insurance will ensure that you get the right coverage at the best price. Give us a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online.

Tags: Construction Insurance, Contractor Insurance, workers comp, Contractor Safety Management, Safety Programs

Workers Compensation Insurance and Liability Insurance

Posted by David Ross on Sat, Jun 13, 2020

Understanding Workers Comp Insurance vs. Liability InsuranceEvery business in Pennsylvania with one or more employees is required to provide Workers’ Compensation Insurance to its employees – with very few exceptions. It’s the law. It doesn’t matter if those employees are full-time or part-time or even family members. Not having workers’ compensation insurance is a criminal offense. In Pennsylvania, you could face fines up to $2,500 and/or prison time.

Workers’ Compensation Insurance is designed to protect both the employee and the employer. There are two essential parts to WC insurance. The first part is coverage for medical expenses, rehabilitation costs, disability compensation, and lost wages when an employee is injured or becomes ill “in the course and scope” of their job, regardless of fault. It also pays death penalties to the family of an employee who is killed on the job.

According to the National Safety Council, the average cost of a WC claim in 2016-2017 was $40,051, with WC claims caused by injuries resulting from motor-vehicle crashes averaging $78,293. For many businesses, paying that amount of money out of pocket could put them out of business.

The second part of WC Insurance is coverage for employer liability. The first part of WC pays medical costs for work-related injuries and illnesses regardless of fault. However, if an employee feels the employer was negligent, they can file a lawsuit for additional damages in some instances. This is where the second part of WC – employer’s liability – kicks in. It helps employers pay for legal expenses, such as attorney’s fees, court fees, and settlements or judgments.

Types of Claims Employer’s Liability Insurance Covers

Third-Party Action

An employee who is injured on the job and receives workers’ comp benefits can’t sue their employer directly; however, they can sue a third party, such as the manufacturer of a piece of equipment that caused the injury. The manufacturer can then file a lawsuit against your company, creating a third-party action lawsuit.

Consequential Damage

An example of consequential damage would be a spouse who is injured as a result of caring for the injured employee.

Loss of Consortium

If an employee is severely injured or killed on the job, their spouse can file a lawsuit when the injury or death results in the loss of a family relationship.  

Dual-Capacity Suit

A dual-capacity lawsuit can occur if the employer and injured employee have more than one relationship. For example, if you manufactured a product that could have caused the injury, the employee can hold you liable.

What About Commercial General Liability (CGL) Insurance?

CGL covers bodily injury, personal injury, and property damage caused during business operations, as a result of one of your products, or on your business premises. Here are a few examples of when CGL will cover you.

  • A customer falls and hurts themselves while in your restaurant.
  • One of your employees accidentally causes a fire while working on the electrical panel in a customer’s home that causes damage.
  • Someone files a libel or slander claim as a result of an ad that you placed.

One of the most important things to remember about Commercial General Liability Insurance is that it does NOT cover bodily injury to an employee. That is what Workers’ Compensation is for.

 

Protect Your Business While Saving Money

American Insuring Group offers both Workers’ Comp Insurance and Commercial General Liability Insurance, along with any other type of insurance you may need to protect your business. Plus, as independent agents, we compare the cost of coverage among many insurance companies to ensure that you get the lowest price on quality insurance protection. Give our experts a call today at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online.

Tags: Workers Compensation Insurance, Professional Liability Lawsuit, Commercial General Liability Insurance, WC Insurance

Opioid Abuse is Increasing WC Insurance Costs in the Construction Industry

Posted by David Ross on Sat, May 30, 2020

Opioid abuse and increased WV insurance costsIn the US, opioids are costing businesses an estimated $42 billion every year due to absenteeism, increased healthcare expenses, lost productivity, and increased Workers’ Compensation Insurance costs. Opioid addiction is the country’s biggest health crisis, and research shows that more than 50% of individuals who die from an opioid overdose had at least one job-related injury.

The opioid crisis is hitting construction workers harder than most. This comes as no surprise since construction workers are more likely to be injured on the job than many other occupations, and 25.3% of those injured workers were prescribed opioids to treat the pain caused by those injuries.

The result is that 15% of construction workers have a substance use disorder, while the national average is nearly half that at 8.6%, according to the National Safety Council.

What are Opioids?

Opioids – a type of painkiller prescribed for short-term relief of acute pain and cancer patients – include Hydrocodone (Vicodin®), Oxycodone (OxyContin®), Oxymorphone (Opana®), Morphine, Codeine, and Fentanyl.

What are the Risks of Opioids?

Here are a few risks with Prescription Opioid use, according to the National Association of Home Builders:

  • Tolerance – People who take opioids quickly build up a tolerance to the drug and need to take a higher dosage to relieve the pain.
  • Dependence – Even when opioids are taken as directed, people quickly become dependent on opioids, and withdrawal is horrible.
  • Misuse – Some people build a tolerance and develop a dependence on opioids, which often causes them to take more than directed.
  • Overdose – Being prescribed opioids is the most significant risk factor for accidental overdose and death.
  • Addition – Individuals who have been prescribed opioids for long-term or chronic pain are 25% more likely to become addicted.
  • Using it as a diversion – In 2017, at least 14% of high school students took prescription opioids “just for fun.
  • Drug interactions – Mixing any prescription drug with alcohol or other drugs can be dangerous, and opioid is no different.

And it isn’t just the people addicted to opioids that are affected. The National Safety Council reports, “Substance use disorders affected 20.8 million Americans, almost 8% of the adult & adolescent population, when you include family members of those affected, nearly 1/3 of the US population is impacted by addiction. While 75% of these people are part of the workforce, most employers are unaware of the hidden costs associated with these problems.”

According to a Center for Construction Research and Training report released earlier this year, “65 unintentional overdose fatalities occurred on the job site in the construction industry in 2018 – a more than nine-fold increase from the seven recorded in 2011. The figure also represents a 35.4% climb from the 48 overdose deaths recorded in 2017.”

Save on Workers’ Compensation Insurance

The National Safety Council reports, “Companies and organizations of all sizes have an important role in promoting the health and safety of employees and managing risks in the workplace.” That includes opioid abuse. Create a safer workplace with a strong safety program that includes opioid education, and you create a workplace where employees thrive, and you enjoy lower Workers’ Compensation Insurance costs.

Want to save more on insurance costs? Give American Insuring Group a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online.

Tags: Workers Compensation Insurance, Contractor Insurance, WC Insurance, Opioid Epidemic

Third-Party Food Delivery Liability and Restaurant Insurance

Posted by David Ross on Sat, May 23, 2020


COVID19 food delivery restaurant insurance tips for restaurant ownersThird-party food delivery got a serious boost when Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf ordered all restaurants and bars to close their dine-in facilities to help stop the spread of COVID-19, while still permitting carry-out, delivery, and drive-through food and beverage service. Many restaurants began offering food delivery through apps such as Grubhub and UberEats. 

It's crucial that restaurants understand potential liability and how Restaurant Insurance can help.

At the end of January 2020 - before the ordered shutdown - Upserve reported that 31% of people in a survey said they use a third-party delivery service at least twice a week. Imagine how that number has skyrocketed in just a few months!

The use of third-party delivery services has allowed many restaurants to continue serving food without investing in a driver or other infrastructure while their dining rooms remain closed. On the other hand, it has also opened restaurants up to potential new liability and legal ramifications.

Here are four questions to ask about potential liability when using a third-party food delivery app.

Who is Liable if a Customer Gets Sick After Eating Your Food That is Delivered by a Third-Party?

It may be impossible to discover where things went wrong. The illness could have been caused by cross-contamination in your kitchen, or it could have been caused by the food sitting in a hot car too long.

Food delivery services do not fall under the Food and Drug Administration’s jurisdiction, so you may find your restaurant being held liable regardless. Before deciding to partner with a third-party delivery app, ask them if their drivers are required to follow any food safety standards - such as hygiene or temperature control – and who will be held liable if there is an illness.

Who is Liable for Issuing Refunds or Other Compensation if There is a Problem With the Food?

Beyond food contamination and illness, many smaller things can go wrong when you hand over your carefully prepared food to a complete stranger. Food can go cold. A pizza could get flipped over in the box, leaving all the cheese stuck to the lid.

You have no control over what happens to the food once it leaves your restaurant; however, it’s still your restaurant’s reputation on the line if your customers are disappointed with the quality of the food. Make sure that you provide the right packaging for the food on your menu and perhaps limit the delivery distance.

Who is Liable if the Delivery Person is in an Automobile Accident While Delivering Your Food?

The food delivery app probably requires that its drivers all have automobile insurance, but don’t assume they do. Ask what insurance policies they require their drivers to have and how they enforce and monitor the requirement.

A driver can present proof of insurance one day and lose it the next day for nonpayment. It may not be a bad idea for you to require proof of insurance from every driver each time they make a pickup at your restaurant.

Who is Liable if the Delivery Service is Not Sanctioned by Your Restaurant and Something Goes Wrong?

Some food delivery brands deliver food from restaurants without permission from the restaurant owners. So it’s crucial that you clearly advertise which third-party delivery services you have partnered with and include a disclaimer about potential liability from unsanctioned services.

How Can I Protect My Restaurant From Liability Issues?

The best way to protect your restaurant from any liability issues is with the right insurance. Talk to an independent insurance agent who specializes in restaurant insurance – like the agents at American Insuring Group – to make sure you get the lowest price for that coverage. Give us a call today at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online.

Tags: Restaurant Insurance, Commercial Liability Insurance, Restaurant Liability Insurance, Restaurant Insurance Costs

Help for Restaurant Owners During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Posted by David Ross on Thu, May 14, 2020

Help for restaurant owners in addition to insurance savings during the Coronavirus pandemicAs specialists in Restaurant Insurance, we typically focus on safety and other ways to lower insurance costs. This blog is a little different but has the same goal - to help restaurants succeed.  

Few industries have escaped the negative impact of the COVID-19 public health crisis, including the restaurant industry. Toast reports that restaurant sales are down 80% since the restrictions on restaurant operations and the shelter in place mandates went into effect.

As a restaurant owner, you may feel powerless, but it’s important to know that there are steps you can take to help ensure the health and safety of your employees, your customers, and your business.

The CARES Act

On March 27, the US government passed a stimulus bill called the “Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act” – or CARES Act – in response to the COVID-19 health crisis. Here are some of the provisions of the Act that could be relevant to restaurant owners and employees.

The Paycheck Protection Program provides $349 billion in federally-guaranteed loans to small businesses. The loan can be used to help pay for employee salary or wages, cash tips, group health care benefits, etc.

The Emergency Relief and Taxpayer Protection provides loans, loan guarantees, and other investments for direct lending that meet specific criteria, such as a lack of alternative financing and a business that is a US-domiciled business with most employees located in the US.

The Employee Retention Tax Credit (ERTC) provides a refundable payroll tax credit for half of the wages paid by employers to employees during the crisis. To be eligible, the employer had to fully or partially suspended operations due to the shut-down order and experience a decline of more than 50% in gross receipts.

Businesses can now carry a Net Operating Loss (NOL) from 2018, 2019, or 2020 back five years. Plus, the taxable income limitation is temporarily removed, allowing an NOL to offset income fully.

The federal excise tax is waived on distilled spirits used for or contained in hand sanitizer produced and distributed under FDA guidance throughout 2020.

The tax filing deadline has been extended to July 15, and estimated tax payments can be postponed.

Temporary Policies

Understanding that the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way restaurants are doing business, the FDA has implemented a few temporary policies that are in effect during the COVID-19 public health emergency.

The FDA is temporarily allowing restaurants to sell certain packaged food that is not labeled for retail sale during the COVID-19 pandemic. An example would be ingredients you purchased that can no longer be used to prepare restaurant food.

Restaurants are permitted to sell packaged food that lacks a nutrition facts label as long as it does not make any nutritional claims but does contain other required information, such as an ingredient statement, net quality of contents, etc.

Because many restaurants have switched to takeout only and may be experiencing disruptions in food supply chains, the FDA is also allowing some flexibility to chain restaurants and similar food establishments that are typically required to provide nutritional information on menus.

Employee and Customer Safety

To ensure the safety of your employees, continue to follow established food-safety protocols and CDC and FDA COVID-19 recommendations, including the following:

  • Regularly disinfect and clean all workspaces and equipment with a disinfectant spray or disposable wipes, focusing on surfaces that are frequently touched.
  • Prescreen employees (take their temperature and assess any symptoms before they start work).
  • Provide appropriate PPE, such as gloves, face masks, etc.
  • Ensure that employees follow proper hand hygiene by frequently washing their hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds – before, during, and after food prep, after using the bathroom, after blowing their nose, coughing, or sneezing, etc.
  • Practice social distancing.

Tell employees who are sick to stay home. If an ill employee does come to work, immediately send them home, clean and disinfect their workspace, and consider any employees with close contact to that employee as exposed.

Tell employees that if they know they have been exposed to COVID-19 to tell their supervisor and follow CDC-recommended precautions.

How to Save on Insurance During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Every dollar counts right now, so here are a few tips that could help lower your Restaurant Insurance costs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Check with an experienced insurance agent to determine which of these tips apply to your situation.

  • Lower your estimated payroll on your Workers’ Compensation Insurance.
  • Drop Workers’ Compensation insurance altogether. Purchase again when employees are rehired.
  • Lower the estimated sales on your General Liability Insurance.
  • Change your vehicle usage to pleasure use on your Commercial Vehicle Insurance.
  • If you currently have Liquor Liability Insurance and are not serving liquor, remove the insurance from your policy. Purchase again when you begin serving alcohol.
  • Remove Employment Practices (sexual harassment, discrimination, etc.) coverage if your business is closed, and everyone is laid off.
  • Remove all “non-essential” insurances.
  • Ask your insurance company for maximum discounting due to the pandemic.
  • Ask an independent agent to make some price comparisons on your coverage. With insurance sales down everywhere, you may be able to find a lower rate for the same coverage.

Start Saving on Restaurant Insurance Today!

These are just some of the ways to save on Business Insurance during this pandemic. If you're ready to start saving then give one of the independent agents at American Insuring Group a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online. We would love to help you save money on your Business Insurance during these uncertain times!

Tags: Restaurant Insurance, Commercial Liability Insurance, Business Interruption Insurance

How to Protect Your Bakery With Restaurant Insurance

Posted by David Ross on Sat, May 02, 2020

bakeries_restaurant_insuranceMichael E. Gerber wrote a book called The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don’t Work and What to do About it. In the book, Gerber introduces us to Sarah, a young woman who starts a bakery business to sell the pies that she loves to bake. Sarah is struggling. She’s working twelve hours a day and becoming frustrated and completely burnt out.

Gerber tells her it’s because she’s working “in” her business rather than “on” her business. She’s so busy baking pies, serving customers, cleaning the shop, etc. she doesn’t have time for vital business tasks, such as strategizing, marketing, etc.

The bottom line is that if you aren’t taking time to figure out how to run your business efficiently, how to grow it, and how to protect it, your business will fail. As an insurance broker, American Insuring Group is focused on helping restaurant owners - including bakery shop owners – protect their businesses with the right Restaurant Insurance.

What Types of Restaurant Insurance Does a Bakery Need?

The best way to determine what types of insurance you need is to think about your risks. Go through “what-if” scenarios. For example, what if there’s a fire in my kitchen, and I have to shut down. How will I pay for the repairs? Can I survive with no income while the repairs are made?

What if my delivery truck breaks down? What if… you get the idea. This exercise will help you determine your risks, so you can learn the best way to protect your bakery from those risks.

An experienced insurance agent can help you determine your risks, what you need to protect, and the most economical way to do that. Here is a list of the most common types of restaurant insurance bakeries need.

Commercial General Liability (CGL) Insurance

CGL Insurance helps cover customer injuries that occur at your bakery, customer property damage, and libel or slander lawsuits. For example, a customer trips and falls while picking up his morning bagels and is injured. You may be responsible for paying his medical bills, and there is always the possibility that he will file a lawsuit against you.

Another example would be if someone were to get sick from eating something they purchased at your bakery. Unfortunately, even if the illness was caused by an ingredient that you bought from someone else, most attorneys will name everyone involved (included the baker) in a lawsuit. Most CGL policies include compensation for third-party claims of injury, illness, disease, or death that was caused by food contamination or food borne illness claims.

Commercial Property Insurance

Going back to the “what-if” scenario, if there is a fire in your kitchen, a Commercial Property Insurance policy will help pay for repairs to your equipment and property. Typically, Commercial Property Insurance covers risks such as fire, power outages, theft, etc.

You can expand your coverage to include Business Interruption Insurance that would help pay for lost revenue or sales that would occur while your bakery is closed for repairs.

Business Owner’s Policy (BOP)

A BOP combines CGL and Commercial Property Insurance and helps lower your insurance costs.

Workers’ Compensation Insurance

In Pennsylvania, almost all businesses with one or more employees are required by law to have Workers’ Compensation (WC) Insurance. WC helps pay for medical expenses and lost wages if an employee is injured on the job and protects the employer against accident-related lawsuits by injured employees.

Commercial Vehicle Insurance

If you have a vehicle that you use for business purposes – such as making deliveries, you need Commercial Vehicle Insurance. It covers medical costs and property damage that result in an accident that involves your vehicle.

How Can a Bakery Minimize the Cost of Insurance?

If you’ve decided to work on your business rather than just in your business, you need to take steps to protect your business. The American Insuring Group has agents who specialize in Restaurant Insurance to help you determine your risks and the best way to protect your business. Plus, as independent agents, we compare the cost of your coverage with several insurance companies to ensure you get the best price for that coverage.

Give us a call today at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online.

Tags: Restaurant Insurance, Restaurant Insurance Philadelphia PA, Restaurant Insurance Costs

3 Safety Tips to Lower Contractors Insurance Costs

Posted by David Ross on Sat, Apr 25, 2020

Save_contractors_insurance-1If you want to lower Contractors Insurance costs – from Commercial General Liability to Workers’ Comp Insurance – create a safer worksite. Safety should be your number one priority simply because it’s the right thing to do.

But if you need more incentive or ammunition to pitch a safety program to management, know that safety will also improve your bottom line. A safer work environment improves morale, keeps projects on schedule and under budget, and helps lower insurance costs.

Here are three tips for creating a safer worksite.

Assess the Job Site

Before you begin any new job, take time to assess the job site, identify potential hazards, and determine preventative measures to minimize injury.  Start with OSHA’s Fatal Four – dangers that are responsible for more than half of the construction worker’s deaths.  The fatal four are falls, object strikes, electrocutions, and caught-in/between. Look at a job site and determine how you can minimize those hazards.

Determine areas that should be blocked off while specific tasks are being performed. Install guardrails, catch platforms, nets, and other safety measures to avoid falls. Ensure that scaffolding is constructed correctly, and make sure you have appropriate PPE available for workers, such as safety harnesses, lifelines, and lanyards.

Consider Scheduling

Did you know that a study by the Associated General Contractors of America found that most construction site fatalities occur from 10 am to 3 pm, peaking at noon and that nearly 75% of deaths happened Monday through Thursday? Use that information and schedule safety meetings around noon early in the week. Also, ensure that you have strong safety measures in place for lunch breaks. 

Another safety issue common to the construction industry is over-scheduling workers to meet deadlines. If workers are too physically or mentally exhausted, the best safety practices in the world won’t eliminate injuries. According to OSHA, working 12 hours per day is associated with a 37% increased risk of injury.

A 2005 study of medical residents found that every extended shift scheduled in a month increased the risk of a motor vehicle crash on their commute home by 16.2 %. Motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of work-related deaths in the U.S.

Fatigue was cited as a contributing factor in several major workplace disasters, including the nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island, the Challenger space shuttle explosion, and BP’s Deepwater Horizon oil refinery explosion.

Don’t risk your workers’ health and safety or the health of your company by over-working your employees.  Ensure that all your employees and subcontractors take regular breaks and don’t work too many hours.

Develop a Culture of Safety

If you want your workers to follow your company’s safety procedures, you need to develop a culture of safety from top management on down. Your company should have a safety program that includes regular safety training, meetings, and updates (at least once a week).

Those meetings can include brief onsite recaps to formal OSHA training to fun team-building activities.  And your safety program should be practiced and enforced by everyone. Make safety a priority at your company. Don’t just give it lip service or focus on complying with the minimum OSHA standards.

Follow these three tips to let your employees know that their safety is your number one priority, and your business will experience better employee morale, lower employee turnover, lower insurance rates, and so much more.

Want to Save More on Contractor Insurance?

The American Insuring Group has experienced agents who specialize in Contractors Insurance. Plus, as independent agents, we compare the cost of your insurance with several companies to ensure that you get the best rate on the right coverage.

Give us a call today at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online.

Tags: Construction Insurance, Contractor Insurance, Contractor Safety Management, Safety Programs

Is a Workers Comp Insurance Loss-Sensitive Plan Right for You?

Posted by David Ross on Sat, Apr 18, 2020

save_workers_comp_insuranceMore and more employers are moving away from the traditional guaranteed Workers’ Compensation Insurance plans into loss-sensitive plans. Loss-sensitive plans can help some businesses save money, but for others, a loss-sensitive plan can cost a company more than a guaranteed plan.

How do you know which type of Workers’ Compensation plan will yield the highest return for your business? Here are three tips to help.

Understand the Different Types of Loss-Sensitive Plans Available.

Retrospective Rating Plans

The Insurance Journal defines a retrospective rating plan as a plan “in which the final premium is based on the insured’s actual loss experience during the policy term, subject to a minimum and maximum premium, with the final premium determined by a formula which is guaranteed in the insurance contract.”

With a retrospective rating plan, an employer pays a standard premium - a combination of a basic premium and a loss projection - at the beginning of the policy year. After eighteen months, the insurer uses the employer’s actual losses to calculate a retro premium. If the retro premium is lower than the standard premium, the employer receives a premium from the insurer for the difference. If the retro premium is higher than the standard premium, the employer has to pay an additional premium.

Typically, there is a cap on the additional premium (usually 1.20 times the standard premium) an employer must pay.

Large Deductible Plan

A large-deductible plan is basically a guaranteed WC plan that includes the employer self-insuring part of its compensation losses with a large deductible. With this type of plan, the employer pays a lower premium but is then required to set up an escrow fund and reimburse the insurance company for claims up to a certain dollar amount.

Captives

The Insurance Journal defines captives as “any insurance company that is owned by one or more organizations, and that insures only the owners of the company.” There are typically two types of captives used for WC. One is a single owner, where the company that is insured has complete control over everything, including investments, operations, etc. The other type is a rent-a-captive, which is owned and run by an organization other than the insured, such as a broker, a fronting insurance carrier, etc.

Understand Your Risk Tolerance

The advantage of a guaranteed Workers’ Compensation Insurance plan is that your premiums are very predictable. You can put it into your budget and not worry about it. The cost of loss-sensitive plans can vary significantly. You can include an estimate in your budget, but the actual cost can vary, along with the frequency and timing of payments.

IF your company has a low tolerance for risk, a guaranteed plan may be a better choice. However, if you’ve created an effective safety program, provided all of your employees with appropriate safety training, have a robust return-to-work program, and have minimized workplace injuries, your loss projections should be reasonably accurate. Therefore, you may want to consider taking on more risk with a loss-sensitive plan. You’ve reduced risk within your organization, and a loss-sensitive plan could provide a higher return on your investment.

Consider the Financial Impact of Each Type of Plan

You should understand the impact each type of plan will have on your cash flow and the tax implications of each. A guaranteed cost plan may cost you more; however, it provides consistent payments, and you know how much you’re going to pay. You can put the cost of your premiums into the budget and not worry about it.

However, a loss-sensitive program can offer cash flow advantages because you’re paying for claims as they occur rather than paying an insurance company upfront for expenses that may not occur for months or even years.

Need More Help Lowering Workers’ Compensation Costs?

American Insuring Group is committed to providing the best insurance coverage at the best price. First, we offer blogs for a variety of industries to help improve workplace safety, which will help lower WC costs.

Plus, we are independent agents who specialize in Workers’ Compensation Insurance. Give us a call today at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online.

Tags: Workers Compensation Insurance, PA Workers Compensation Insurance, workers comp costs, Commercial Insurance, Return-To-Work Programs