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Do You Have the Right Restaurant Insurance Coverage?

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Nov 24, 2019

AIG Cook with questionmarksWhether you are a new restaurant owner or have been in business for decades, Restaurant Insurance can be complicated. You probably have lots of questions, such as what insurance do I really need to protect my business and what insurance can I do without.

There aren’t any cookie-cutter answers to these questions because every restaurant has different types and levels of risks, and every restaurant owner has different levels of risk they are comfortable with.

Here are 7 Tips to Help You Get the Right Insurance for Your Restaurant:  

Understand What Factors Affect Your Insurance Rates:

Many factors go into the cost of your restaurant insurance. Some you have control over and some you do not. Understanding which factors can affect the cost of your insurance allows you to make informed business decisions.

For example, if you’re thinking about serving alcohol at your restaurant, you can go to your insurance provider to determine just how much that decision would increase your premiums. Maybe you determine that the increased revenue will be worth the increase in your insurance premiums, or maybe you determine that it is not. The bottom line is that you made a sound business decision because you had the facts.  

Here are ten factors that can affect the cost of your insurance premiums:

  1. Years in business
  2. Location
  3. The volume of your sales, payroll, and square feet
  4. Type of property
  5. Lease requirements
  6. Loss history
  7. Activities
  8. Hours of operation
  9. The sale of alcohol
  10. Level of coverage

Make Sure Your Restaurant is Properly Classified

Your restaurant’s classification will affect both your Workers’ Comp Insurance as well as your General Liability Insurance costs. If you own a diner that is only open from 6 am to 2 pm, you want to make sure that you are not given the classification of a bar that stays open until 2 am. There are more risks for a bar staying open until 2 am, and you will pay a higher premium due to those risks.

It’s in your best interest to be honest with your insurance agent about the type of restaurant you own. For example, if you neglect to tell him or her that you serve alcohol, and someone who was served alcohol at your restaurant causes an accident, you may not be covered. One nasty lawsuit against your restaurant could easily put you out of business without the proper protection.

Ask About Pay as You Go Workers’ Compensation Insurance

Most businesses in Pennsylvania are required to carry Workers’ Compensation Insurance for their employees. Most insurance carriers require a 25% estimated premium upfront. If you have a lot of employees, that could do some serious damage to your cash flow.

Pay as you go Workers’ Compensation Insurance allows you to pay your premium each month based on your actual payroll rather than an estimate. Pay as you go is particularly helpful for new restaurants that don’t yet know how much their payrolls will be. Pay as you go WC Insurance also eliminates the need for audits.

Don’t Assume That You Do Not Need Commercial Auto Insurance

If you have a vehicle that either you or your employees use for your restaurant, you will need commercial insurance coverage. Even if your employees use their vehicle to run errands like making bank deposits, you may still be held liable if they are in an accident. A non-owned auto policy can help cover your restaurant in that situation.

Consider Cyber Liability Insurance

Just because you are a small business doesn’t mean that you are not at risk for a data breach. In fact, according to Small Biz Trends, 43% of cyber attacks still target small businesses. According to IBM, the average total cost of a data breach in the US is $3.92 million. Of course, this number is skewed due to the really big data breaches like Target experienced, but even having a few of your customers falling victim to a data breach could cost your business thousands of dollars, along with your reputation.

Ask About a Business Owner’s Package (BOP)

A BOP bundles your insurance policies together. Most insurance companies like to bundle your policies because it means more business for them, and bundling policies usually means a discount for you as well.

Bundling with one company also helps ensure that there are no gaps in your coverage, and it could speed up the processing of any claims you have to file.

Understand the Difference Between a Captive Agent and an Independent Agent

A captive agent only represents one company. The agents at the American Insuring Group are all independent agents, which means they can compare the cost of your coverage with several different companies. Often, this means lower premium payments for you.

How to Save Even More on Restaurant Insurance

Perhaps the best way to save on Restaurant Insurance and still ensure that you have enough coverage to protect your restaurant is to work with an insurance agent who is familiar with your industry and its risks, like the independent insurance agents American Insuring Group.

We specialize in Restaurant Insurance and will compare pricing and coverage among lots of insurance companies to find you the very best deal. Don't delay - call us at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online.

Tags: Workers Compensation Insurance, Commercial Vehicle Insurance, Restaurant Insurance, Restaurant Insurance Costs

4 Types of Insurance Every Subcontractor Should Consider

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Nov 17, 2019

AIG 2 construction workersIf you get hired as a subcontractor, don’t assume that the general contractor’s Contractors Insurance covers you. As a subcontractor, you are NOT considered an employee of that contractor, and Contractor’s Insurance rarely covers subcontractors. Often, injury or damage caused by a subcontractor is specifically excluded from contractors' insurance policies.

And we don’t have to tell you how dangerous your occupation is. The chances of you or one of your employees injuring themselves or causing damage or injury to something or someone else is not out of the range of possibility.

In fact, according to Safety + Health magazine, a construction worker has a 75% likelihood of experiencing a disabling injury and a 1-in-200 chance of being fatally injured on the job. And don’t think because you own a small company that you’re immune to these statistics. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Nearly half of all deaths on construction sites occur in companies with ten or fewer employees or among those who are self-employed.”

While there are no laws that require you to purchase insurance as a subcontractor, you can see why it’s the smart thing to do. Plus, many contractors will require that you have certain types of insurance to work with them.

4 Types of Insurance Every Subcontractor Should Consider:

Commercial General Liability (CGL) Insurance

CGL is one of the most important insurance products for any business. CGL protects your business if you are liable for property damage. It covers the cost of medical and legal expenses and damages if you are found liable. One serious lawsuit can put you out of business if you don’t have the right protection.

Here are three examples of situations where CGL can help:

  • Someone visiting your job site trips and falls over materials and is injured.
  • An employee leaves the water running in the sink of a customer’s home and causes damage to the home.
  • Someone walking by your job site is hit by flying debris and dies.

As a subcontractor, you have two options: you can ask the general contractor to add you as an “additional insured” to their CGL policy, or you can purchase CGL on your own. Most general contractors will require that you purchase your own CGL policy and will very likely include this requirement in your contract and ask you to provide proof of insurance. When you talk to your insurance agent, make it clear that you are purchasing CGL is a subcontractor, not a general contractor.

Workers’ Compensation Insurance

If you are a sole proprietor and are injured on the job, would you have enough money to cover medical expenses? As s a sole proprietor would you be able to continue to provide for your family if you were unable to work for a month or two due to a worksite injury? Workers’ Compensation Insurance will help pay your medical expenses and even lost wages until you are back on your feet.

If you have employees, most states required (with a few exceptions) that you have Workers Comp for each of your employees. WC covers medical expenses, lost wages, and rehabilitation costs if an employee is injured or killed on the job.

Another benefit of workers’ comp insurance is that it covers legal costs if the injured employee were to sue your business.

Commercial Automobile Insurance

If you use a vehicle (which, of course, most in the construction industry do) to conduct business such as transporting materials, equipment, or employees, you should have commercial automobile insurance to help protect you in the event of an accident that causes bodily injury, loss of life, or property damage. 

A personal auto policy may not be enough as certain types of vehicles can be excluded from those policies, and it may not offer high enough limits.

Builders Risk Insurance

Builders Risk Insurance (Aka Course of Construction or Inland Marine Coverage) covers a building under construction along with materials related to the project. It typically provides coverage for damage caused by fire, wind, theft, lightning, hail, explosion, and vandalism. Standard exclusions include events such as an earthquake or employee theft.

We'll Help You Find the Contractor Insurance That's Right for You!

An insurance agent (like those at American Insuring Group) who specializes in Contractors Insurance can help ensure that you have the right insurance to protect your business. The independent agents at American Insuring Group will compare the cost of that coverage with several insurance companies to ensure that you get the best price on the protection you need! Give us a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online.

Tags: Commercial Vehicle Insurance, Builders Insurance, Construction Insurance, Contractor Insurance, Commercial Liability Insurance

5 Factors Impacting Commercial Truck Insurance Cost

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Apr 07, 2019

Truck Insurance Cost Factors in PennsylvaniaTruck drivers face many things they can’t control as they drive from point A to point B delivering their cargo – inclement weather, traffic, road construction, distracted drivers, and the list goes on.

It’s good to know that there is one thing that truck drivers do have some control over, and that is their trucking insurance costs!

Small businesses and owner-operators offering trucking services invest in commercial truck insurance to protect their investment from all those things they can’t control. There are many different types of commercial truck insurance such as trailer interchange insurance, cargo insurance, and more.

The First Step

There are several factors that go into determining your insurance premiums. Each insurance company weighs each of those factors differently. Your first step to controlling your commercial truck insurance premiums is to work with a good insurance agent who specializes in truck insurance, knows what questions to ask, understands your risks, and can compare costs among competing insurance companies in order to keep your costs low.

Here are 5 Factors that Affect the Cost of Your Commercial Truck Insurance, and Ways to Lower Your Premiums:


1- Previous Claims History

If you or your company have a history of high claims rates, there’s a good chance that you’ll make multiple claims in the future. Insurance companies offer lower premiums to companies that have fewer claims.

SOLUTION:
Lower the number of accidents and claims by creating a culture of safety with ongoing safety training and safety programs for your drivers.

2 - Driving Records

Insurance companies will look at the claim history and driving records of all your drivers. If they see drivers with multiple violations or accidents, you will pay higher insurance premiums.

SOLUTION:
Do thorough background checks on anyone you’re considering hiring and provide ongoing safety training for your drivers.

3 – Policy Structure

Chances are you’re going to need more than one policy to protect all of your investments. Purchasing insurance policies from different insurance companies may appear to save you money, but often bundling multiple policies with one company ends up saving you money.

SOLUTION:
Find an independent agency like American Insuring Group who can compare costs with several companies and analyze the results side-by-side to determine the best solution for your needs.

4 - Vehicles

A truck with a higher price tag will also be more expensive to insure. Larger and heavier vehicles may not be as easy to navigate as smaller vehicles, and in an accident are likely to cause more damage, which will also increase your premium payments.

SOLUTION:
Purchase the right vehicle for the job. Don’t buy a larger or more expensive vehicle than what you need.

5 - Driving Locations

Where you drive can affect the probability of having an accident. You’re less likely to have an accident driving along a stretch of country road with little or no traffic than driving a big city street during rush hour. Also, the further you travel, the higher the chance of an accident. The higher risk of an accident, the higher the insurance premiums.

Request an Annual Truck Insurance Review

Keep in mind that there is nothing more constant in life than change, and that applies in the trucking business as well – new drivers, new vehicles, changing claims rates, etc., so it’s vital to schedule an annual review with your insurance agent if you want to ensure that you have the best coverage at the best price.

Ready to Save on Truck Insurance? Call the Experts at American Insuring Group!

Contact us to save on PA Truck InsuranceAmerican Insuring Group specializes in trucking insurance, and we’re independent agents, so we’ll make sure that your commercial vehicle has the best insurance protection at the lowest price (unlike many of our competitors, we’re not locked into one solution).

So, give us a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or contact us online. Start saving today!

Tags: Commercial Vehicle Insurance, truck insurance, Trucking Insurance

7 Questions Truckers Should Ask About Insurance

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Mar 03, 2019

Truck Insurance Questions to ask your insurance agent in PA, NJ, DE, MD, OH and more.Your truck is your livelihood and the best way to protect it is with the proper truck insurance. By "proper" we mean insurance that covers your specific needs and doesn’t leave any gaps – all at the best price.

The best way to do that is to work with an independent insurance agent – like those at American Insuring Group – who specialize in truck insurance and have the freedom to compare coverage and pricing from several different insurance carriers and then present you with options and recommendations.

Knowing the right questions to ask your agent is important because it will help reveal the depth of their knowledge so you can decide if they are right for you.

Here are seven questions to ask your insurance agent to make sure that you get the right coverage at the right price:

How long have you been selling truck insurance?

The risks, costs, and required coverages involved with an 18-wheeler are significantly different than those of a regular car. Having an agent knowledgeable in truck insurance can help ensure that your investment is adequately protected.

How much coverage is right for me?

A minimum of $1,000,000 liability insurance coverage is mandatory for most commercial trucks, but it’s important to remember that trucks can cause a lot more damage than a car. Ask your agent to take you through what-if scenarios and different limit options available to you. Also, ask about the benefits and costs of an umbrella policy, which can protect you in the event of a catastrophic loss.

Do you offer broad form cargo coverage?

Depending on what you are hauling, the standard $100,000 of cargo coverage may leave gaps in your coverage, so your agent should understand the types of cargo you haul and the risks associated with that cargo. Ask your agent if they offer broad form coverage, which protects you against specific risks not covered by basic cargo insurance.

What is my deductible and do you offer a combined deductible?

Increasing your deductibles should lower the cost of your premiums, but it’s essential that you ensure that you have enough available cash to pay that higher deductible if you need to pay it.

You may have coverage on multiple items such as your tractor, your cargo, and another damaged vehicle (the one you hit), but each of them may come with a separate deductible. With a combined deductible – which doesn’t usually cost much more – you only pay one deductible for all lines of coverage or all vehicles in one claim.

What affects the cost of my premiums?

The most common things that affect your premium costs are age, driving record, years of experience, what you’re hauling, the age of your equipment, area of operation, criminal record, and credit score. If you know what factors are affecting your premium, you may be able to take steps to fix that factor before your next renewal or go with a carrier that doesn’t put as much emphasis on a particular risk.

How quickly can you react to my needs?

Ask them how quickly they can get you your certificate of insurance and how quickly they can change your policy. If you haul different cargo from day to day, you need an agent who can quickly update your policy for you. Ask your agent, “How easy is it to reach you, and if you’re out of the office is there someone else who can help me?”

Most (but not all) insurance companies now have 24-hour claims services. Don’t assume anything; ask your agent if it’s available to you. 

What discounts are available?

Some discounts are required by law such as for airbags or anti-lock brakes, but there are often other discounts that may not be required or as standard but may apply to you. Potential discounts can include paying in full, packaging, prior insurance savings, and more.

 

Ask the Truck Insurance Pros at American Insuring Group!

Experts in truck insurance in Philadelphia, the Lehigh Valley, Reading, Lancaster, Pittsburgh, Erie, PA, MD, OH, NJ and DE.A good truck insurance agent can not only protect your investment but also be a great asset to your business.

When you’re ready to purchase your next policy, give the experienced independent agents at American Insuring Group a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or contact us online.

We’ll be happy to answer these and all of your questions to help you get the right insurance at the best price!

Tags: Commercial Vehicle Insurance, truck insurance, Trucking Insurance

Truck Insurance Safety Tips for Drivers on Unfamiliar Roads

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Feb 03, 2019

Follow these truck insurance safety tips when driving your commercial vehicle on unfamiliar roads!As a commercial vehicle driver, you probably travel on unfamiliar roads quite often, and when you’re unfamiliar with the roads, you’re more likely to get lost – an unclear turn, an unexpected accident, bad visibility.

When you get lost, it’s easy to get frustrated and impatient and make bad choices that can lead to accidents – especially when you’re on a tight schedule.

When you’re traveling on a familiar road, you know where that sharp turn is, where traffic tends to back up, and where that unexpected stop sign is located. When you’re on unfamiliar roads, you don’t have those advantages, which makes safe driving practices even more vital 

In fact, the Large Truck Crash Causation Study found that nearly one-quarter of large-truck crashes occurred when CMV drivers were unfamiliar with the roadway.

More accidents mean more injuries, which translates to higher truck insurance costs

Here are 3 tips to help you navigate unfamiliar roads more safely:

1 - Plan Your Route Ahead of Time

Before you get behind the wheel, take a look at a map or your GPS and have your route planned. If you’re driving along and realize you got off track, pull off somewhere safe where you can refer to your map or guidance system to regain your bearings.

It may be tempting to adjust electronic devices while you’re driving. Don’t do it! Taking your eyes off the road for even a few seconds can result in an accident, and when you’re driving a 50,000-pound truck, the chances of that accident being severe enough to cause an injury are high.

If you’re transporting hazardous materials, you should also be aware of any route restrictions or designated routes required by state and local townships.

2 - Don’t Make Knee-Jerk Decisions

You’re in the passing lane of the interstate when you notice that you’re about to pass the exit you’re supposed to take. When you realize your mistake, you may be tempted to try to turn onto that exit quickly. Don’t do it! It isn’t worth the chance of causing injury to yourself or another driver. 

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration NAFTA Safety Stats, almost 50,000 moving violations from 2004 to 2007 were classified as improper turns or improper lane changes.

If you miss a turn, get off at the next exit or go around the block instead of making a knee-jerk decision.  

3 - Communicate With Other Drivers

Let other drivers know in advance what you intend to do – even if that’s just changing lanes – by using your turn signal. A recent study reported that there are approximately 630,000 lane-change crashes annually (involving both large trucks and passenger vehicles).

Here are other ways you can try to communicate with drivers around you:

  • Use your 4-way flashers if you have to pull off to the side of the road or when traffic is unexpectedly stopped in front of you.

  • Toot your horn to sound an alarm and warn another driver of your presence. Please, note that we say “tooting” and not “laying on” your horn. The misuse of a horn has been known to cause road rage, but it is one of the few ways that a driver can get the attention of another driver to prevent an accident.

  • Turn on your headlights. It can make your vehicle more visible especially at night or in bad weather. In fact, some trucks are programmed to have the low beam headlights on whenever the engine is running, and some states require the use of headlights when the windshield wipers are on. So make sure your headlights, turn signals, and brake lights are clean and use your headlights when appropriate.

When you’re driving on unfamiliar roads, it’s even more crucial that you exercise safe driving habits to keep yourself and those around you safe. Lower trucking insurance premiums that go with fewer accidents and claims is just icing on the cake.

Want to Save on Truck Insurance?

Affordable PA truck insurance for truckers in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Erie, Lancaster, Allentown, Harrisburg and Reading, PA.American Insuring Group can help you save even more on your trucking insurance. As independent agents, we’re free to shop the market for you among competing insurance carriers. So give us a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online to start saving!

Tags: Commercial Vehicle Insurance, truck insurance, Commercial Insurance, Trucking Insurance, Safe Driving Tips

5 Questions to Ask about Commercial Truck Insurance

Posted by David Ross on Fri, Jan 04, 2019

Ask your truck insurance agent in PA, NJ, and DE these questions to help you find affordable trucking insuranceAs a business owner, you wear many hats, but let’s face it, you can’t be an expert on every subject. Knowing the right questions to ask someone who is an expert is often key to running a successful business. How to find the best trucker’s liability insurance for your business is a good example.

The first step is finding an experienced and reputable insurance agent that specializes in truck insurance - like the independent agents at American Insuring Group. We’ll find you the right coverage at the best price, and we’re always happy to answer any of your questions.

 

Here are 5 questions to ask your insurance agent about Commercial Truck Insurance:

1 - What is covered - and perhaps even more important – what is NOT covered?

To understand the answer to that question you first need to understand the four basic types of liability insurance available to you:

Primary Auto Liability Insurance is the very minimum insurance you should have on your truck and is required in every state. It covers any damage or injuries to other motorists that result in an accident that is considered your fault. It’s important to make sure that you meet limit requirements on this type of insurance, and it’s often prudent to go beyond the bare minimum.

General Liability Insurance covers your truck when it is not on the road such as when you’re parked on a parking lot, stopping at a restaurant, or loading your vehicle.

Non-owned Trailer Liability & Trailer Interchange covers physical damage to a trailer that you are hauling but do not own while it’s in your possession. This type of insurance is usually not included in your primary or general liability insurance.

Motor Truck Cargo Liability Insurance covers damage to the freight or commodity that you are hauling in the event of things such as fires or accidents.

Because each policy is a little different, it’s important to ask your insurance agent lots of questions about which types of liability insurance you need to protect your assets and then go through what-if scenarios with them.

2 - If I’m in an accident, how do I submit an insurance claim?

You should submit a claim as soon as possible because the faster you file the claim, the faster it can be settled. You can contact the insurance company’s claims department directly or contact your agent to guide you through the process.

3 - If I’m in an accident, how much will my truck insurance policy pay?

This is vital information to know if you want to ensure that you’re adequately covered. You may decide to take a higher deductible to lower your premiums, but you need to understand that this will also reduce the amount you’re paid in the event of an accident. You have to then ask yourself, “Do I have enough cash on hand to cover that deductible?”

4 - Do I have to pay my entire insurance premium at one time?

Most insurance companies offer several options for payment such as making monthly installments rather than paying it all in one lump sum. However, you will save money by paying in full up front. 

5 - How can I save on premiums?

We already mentioned that you could increase your deductible to lower your trucking insurance premiums, but one of the best ways to reduce your insurance costs is to decrease the number of claims you make by carefully vetting and training your drivers. Driving records and credit scores can affect how much you pay for insurance, and well-trained drivers can reduce the number of claims, which will also affect your premiums. 

 

Take the First Step to Save on Truck Insurance Today!

Contact us today to save on truck insurance in Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh, Erie, Allentown, PA, NJ, DE and far beyond.Another great way to save money on your insurance premiums is to work with an independent insurance agent like American Insuring Group. We will analyze pricing and coverage among many competing insurance carriers to deliver the right coverage at the best price for your particular needs.  

Give us a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or contact us online.

You can also learn more about  your Commercial Trucking Insurance options on our website.

Tags: Commercial Vehicle Insurance, truck insurance, Commercial Insurance, Trucking Insurance

The Right Way to Insure Food Trucks

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Dec 09, 2018

Insurance tips for your food truck businessIn 2015, the food truck industry was valued at $856.7 million, and it is expected to grow to $996.2 million by 2020. There are many reasons for this growth including the seemingly easy entry into the restaurant business that it provides.

Low Start Up Costs

You can purchase a food truck for as little as a few thousand dollars, but like any business, it’s imperative that you protect your assets and your business. One way to protect both is with the right insurance.

Insuring a food truck can be a little tricky because it has many of the risks associated with commercial vehicles as well as those associated with restaurant insurance, not to mention all the risks that all businesses face, plus a few that are unique to the food truck industry.

4 Unique Risks

For example, it is more difficult to regulate temperatures on a food truck, which can increase the risk of food contamination and food poisoning. Plus, the small food prep area in food trucks create a greater chance of accidentally exposing customerswith food allergies to allergens. Slip and fall injuries can occur both inside and outside of a food truck, and trucks can be easier to break into than brick-and-mortar restaurants.

Another consideration is Workers Compensation Insurance. In Pennsylvania, It is required for most – but not all - businesses with employeesto have WC insurance. If you fall into the “not all” category, you may be tempted to forego WC coverage to “save money.” But kitchens can be dangerous places where injuries can happen, and medical bills can quickly add up to significantly more than the money you saved.

Don’t Skimp on Insurance

It may be tempting to try to save money by only purchasing the minimum insurance required by law or by the venue where you park your truck, but that minimum may not be enough to protect your business.

For example, many festivals require a minimum $1 million in general liability coverage. You can purchase liability insurance to cover just that event, but then you leave your business open to risks when it’s not at the event. Plus, buying insurance on an event-by-event basis can be significantly more expensive than purchasing it on a yearly basis.

If you keep the big picture in mind when purchasing insurance for your food truck, you allow your business the flexibility and freedom it may need to grow along with the protection you need to stay in business.

To ensure that you have the proper protection, it is best to consult with an independent insurance agent who specializes in food truck and restaurant insurance. We can help determine any mandated minimum insurance requirements along with any additional risks your business may face.

  

Here are some of the types of insurance to consider for your food truck business:

 

1 - General Liability Insurance

This insurance protects your business from lawsuits or claims made by third parties including physical injury, property damage, and legal fees.

2 - Commercial Auto Insurance

This insurance helps cover risks while you are driving your food truck. If you are in an auto accident, it helps cover the cost of medical, repair, and legal expenses.

3 - Business Owner’s Insurance

This insurance combines business content coverage and general liability insurance to cover both lawsuits and damage to your property, and it usually costs less than buying property and general liability coverage separately.  

4 - Worker’s Compensation Insurance

This insurance pays for medical expenses, lost wages, and lawsuits if one of your employees is hurt on the job. 

5 - Additional Insurance

Other types of commercial insurance you may want to consider include…

  • Umbrella Insurance, which goes above the normal limits covered by your liability and auto policies
  • Food Spoilage Insurance, which covers you if your food spoils due to equipment breakdown, mechanical failure, or power outage
  • Loss of Income Insurance, which covers some of your income if your food truck is damaged, and you’re unable to continue operations.

  

Do it Right! Contact Us for Help in Making a Smart Decision

Contact us about food truck insurance in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Erie, Allentown, Reading, Lancaster, PA and more.If you aren’t absolutely sure what you need to properly protect your food truck business, give the independent insurance agents at American Insuring Group a call.

We specialize in restaurant and food truck insurance and can help you sift through all your risks and options in order to properly protect your business. Simply contact us at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848, or click here to contact us online.

Tags: Commercial Vehicle Insurance, Restaurant Insurance, Small Business Insurance, Business Insurance, Food Truck Insurance

4 Seat Belt Safety Myths for Truck Drivers

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Nov 18, 2018

Seatbelt use can help lower the cost of truck insurance in Philadelphia, Lancaster, Pittsburgh, Erie, Allentown, PA and beyond. Contact us to learn more.One of the best ways to reduce truck insurance and other costs is to reduce injuries, and one of the best ways a trucking company can do that is to ensure that ALL drivers wear seatbelts when they are operating a vehicle. Plus, it’s the law, and failure to use a seat belt can result in fines.

Pretty simple, right?

Seat Belts Save Truckers!

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), seat belts saved over 12,000 lives in 2001. One recent study reported that 23 percent of combination truck, single-vehicle crashes involved the driver not wearing a safety belt. There is also data that suggests that not wearing a seat belt can be indicative of other risky driving behaviors.

The good news is that the majority of people in vehicles are wearing seatbelts.  According to the NHTSA, 90% of people riding in vehicles were wearing seat belts in 2016. The one in ten who aren’t buckling up leave themselves more vulnerable to injuries and death if they’re in an accident. Younger males and commercial truck drivers are among the most likely NOT to wear a seat belt.

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), 84% of medium and heavy-duty truck and bus drivers were wearing seat belts in 2013. The rate for passengers in these commercial vehicles was even lower – 73%.

5x as Likely to Die Without Seatbelts – Need a Better Reason?

Here’s what the Center for Health Systems Research and Analysis by the University of Wisconsin found during an analysis of 13,854 crash victims found:

  • Persons not wearing seat belts were 5.4 times as likely to die as those wearing belts.
  • Persons not wearing seat belts were 91% more likely to be hospitalized than those wearing belts.
  • Persons not wearing seat belts were 14% more likely to have EMS transport

So, you can see how not wearing a seat belt can affect your trucking insurance costs and your company’s bottom line.

 

Here are 4 myths about wearing a seat belt to share with your drivers: 

 

#1 - I don’t Need to Wear a Seat Belt if Driving a Short Distance

An accident can happen anytime. If you have to make a sudden stop, or if you’re involved in an accident, your seat belt will keep you in your seat and help to prevent injury or death that can occur from being thrown from your seat into the steering wheel, dash, or windshield or even out of the car.

#2 - Passengers don’t Need to Wear a Seat Belt

According to a 2001 NHTSA report, 60% of all passengers killed in traffic accidents were not wearing a seat belt. 

#3 - I’m Safer Without a Seat Belt

Many people think that it’s better to be thrown clear of the vehicle in the event of a crash. Statistics show otherwise. A person is four times more likely to be fatally injured when thrown from a vehicle.

In 2016, more than 200 truck occupants and drivers died when they were ejected from their cabs during an accident. Wearing a seatbelt can keep you from being dragged along the ground, being crushed under a vehicle, and being thrown through a windshield.

#4 - If I’m a Good Driver, I Don’t Need to Wear a Seat Belt

You may be an excellent driver, but unfortunately, not all drivers on the road are. Plus, there are sometimes factors beyond your control – bad weather, mechanical failure, or a tire blowout – that can cause you to have an accident.

If you want to keep your employees safer and reduce your insurance costs, make it clear to your employees that wearing a seat belt is a requirement, not an option!

 

Here’s an Easy Way to Lower Your Truck Insurance Cost!

Your Trusted Choice Independent Trucking Insurance Agent in PennsylvaniaAnother way to reduce the cost of commercial vehicle insurance, including both trucks and cars, is to work with one of the independent agents at American Insuring Group.

We specialize in truck insurance and will compare the costs and features of competing insurance company policies to make sure that you’re getting the best price on reliable coverage.

Give us a call today at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848, or contact us online.

Tags: Commercial Vehicle Insurance, truck insurance, Business Insurance, Trucking Insurance

Truckers - Here's How to Save $500 on ELD Costs

Posted by David Ross on Mon, Oct 29, 2018
American Insuring Group has partnered with Progressive Commercial to offer our Progressive truck insurance customers your option of $500 or free use of an ELD device!

It’s an easy and smart way to satisfy the ELD mandate at no cost to you. As the #1 Commercial Truck insurer, Progressive recognizes the costs of the ELD mandate and they have developed the Smart Haul program to make it as easy as possible on Progressive customers.

Lower your trucking costs with the Smart Haul program!

 

2 Smart Ways to Save With Smart Haul

#1 - Get Free Use of an ELD

Progressive will provide you with free use of an ELD device and pay your monthly subscription, as long as you share your driving data with them. There are no additional costs, however, you will need to return the device if you wish to opt-out or cancel your coverage.

# 2 - The Compensation Program (Get $500)

You can purchase your own Rand McNally ELD 50 or DC 200. If you are a Progressive customer and agree to share your driving data with them, they’ll pay you $100 for plugging it in, then pay an additional $100 for each quarter that the device stays plugged in, up to $500. 

Don't Delay - This is a Limited Time Offer!

Both offers are available for a limited time only, so act quickly to take full advantage of the benefits! Contact us today to learn more! 

Contact us to save on Smart Haul and lower your trucking costs!

Tags: Commercial Vehicle Insurance, truck insurance, Trucking Insurance, Electronic Logging Devices - ELD, ELD Mandate

Truck Driver Fatalities and How to Avoid Them

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Oct 21, 2018

Truck Insurance Costs are Impacted by the Rate of Driver FatalitiesEvery time a truck driver gets into his vehicle, he’s facing the possibility of an accident, and accidents that involve big rigs have a higher probability of causing severe injury, which of course impacts the cost of trucking insurance.

It’s no surprise that the transportation industry has the highest incidence of fatal work injuries. According to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), there were 1,388 transportation and material moving workers fatally injured at work in 2016. That number accounted for 40% of all reported on-the-job fatalities.

Increasing safety and minimizing accidents is one of your best defenses against rising commercial vehicle insurance costs and the ever-increasing shortage of truck drivers.

Accidents and Driver Error 

Most accidents that involve big rigs are due to driver error including lack of poor judgment, speeding, using a mobile device, not being aware of blind spots, driving under the influence, and driving while fatigued. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) states, “Even the most well-trained, safety-conscious commercial motor vehicle (CMV) driver is at risk of engaging in driving behaviors that could lead to a crash on today’s crowded highways.”

Understanding what causes truck accidents and how to avoid them is the first step. Providing ongoing safety training for drivers and enforcing a culture of safety is the next step. It may seem like a lot of effort up-front, but the payoff will be far-reaching and long-term.

 

Here are 3 tips for safe driving leading to lower truck insurance costs:

1 - Stay Sharp/Pay Attention

Truck drivers need to pay attention to their surroundings: unexpected road conditions, distracted drivers, and drivers who don’t understand how commercial vehicles operate. FMCSA suggests scanning ahead about a quarter of a mile on interstates and one or two blocks in cities and checking the mirrors every 8-10 seconds to be aware of vehicles entering blind spots.

There is a good reason why it is illegal for commercial drivers to text while driving. According to FMCSA, “The odds of being involved in a crash, near-crash, or unintentional lane deviation are 23.2 times greater for truck and bus drivers who are texting while driving.”

Other deadly distractions include eating, drinking, map reading, or any activity that takes your focus off the road. If you need to do something while you’re driving, get off at the next exit or pull over somewhere safe. 

And do not get behind the wheel of a truck when you are tired, too ill to focus, or on medications that can make you drowsy. According to the Large Truck Crash Causation Study (LTCCS), 13 percent of commercial motor vehicle drivers were considered to be fatigued at the time of their crash, and a recent study showed that 17% were reported as having “over-the-counter drug use” when they were in an accident.

2 - Buckle Up

Buckle up; it’s the law. You’ve seen the signs, and that doesn’t just apply to passenger vehicles. FMCSAstates, “A CMV which has a seat belt assembly installed at the driver's seat shall not be driven unless the driver has properly restrained himself/herself with the seat belt assembly.” According to the FMCSA, “a safety belt is the most important in-cab safety device that will protect an occupant in the event of a sudden stop or crash.”

No matter how good of a driver you are or how uncomfortable you may think they are, you should wear a seat belt at all times.

3 - Know When to Slow Down

According to the Large Truck Crash Causation Study, 23% of large-truck crashes occur when drivers travel too fast for conditions. Some conditions to pay attention to are wet roads, reduced visibility, uneven roads, construction zones, curves, and intersections.

Drivers should reduce their speed by 1/3 on wet roads and by ½ or more on snow packed roads. Roads can be particularly slippery when it first begins to rain. Typically, manufacturers advise against using a retarder on wet or slippery roads. 

There’s a reason there are reduced speed limits at curves: 40% of speeding-related fatalities occur on curves. Braking in a curve can cause the wheels to lock up and the vehicle to skid, and trucks entering a curve too quickly can lose control and roll over due to a truck’s high center of gravity.

Work zones present many hazards such as lane shifts, moving workers, and uneven road surfaces and are particularly dangerous areas for truckers. In 2014, 30% of fatal work zone crashes involved at least one large truck. Decrease your speed and get into the correct lane well ahead of work zones. Leave extra room between vehicles, obey all work zone signs, watch for road workers, and be prepared to slow down or stop suddenly.

More Safe Driving Tips for Truckers

Check out FMCSA’s website for more safe driving tips. It just might save a life and help you save on trucking insurance as a bonus!

 

How to Save Big On Truck Insurance 

To learn more about saving on trucking insurance, give American Insuring Group a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848, or contact us online. We specialize in trucking insurance, and as independent agents, we will compare the cost and coverage of multiple insurance companies to ensure that you get the best price on reliable commercial vehicle insurance. Contact us today!

Tags: Commercial Vehicle Insurance, truck insurance, Business Insurance, Trucking Insurance