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Lower Trucking Workers’ Comp Costs With Safety Training

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Jun 09, 2019

save-truck-workers-comp-300If you want to lower workers’ compensation insurance costs in your trucking company, the solution is simple! Provide safety training to lower the number of injuries, cultivate happier and more productive employees, and lower your WC costs. 

When it comes to safety training for truck drivers, it’s natural to think about steps to avoid traffic accidents. After all, the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) reports that crashes are the leading cause of on-the-job deaths for truck drivers in the US. 

But truck drivers also incur injuries getting in and out of their trucks or handling cargo, and these injuries can affect your workers’ comp costs. The good news is that many common workplace injuries in the trucking industry are preventable with the right safety training. 

Here are four areas that should be included in any safety training in the trucking industry if you want to lower your workers’ comp costs

Slips, Trips, and Falls

According to the National Safety Council (NSC), 23,490 transportation and warehousing employees were injured in falls, and 46 died in 2016. The NSC also found that the fall doesn’t have to be from a high level to cause severe and sometimes fatal injuries.

Here are fall safety tips:

  • Ensure proper training on the use of all equipment
  • Never push or carry a load that will block your vision
  • Clean up spills immediately
  • Keep areas where employees will be walking free of clutter
  • Make sure all mats, rugs, and carpets lie flat
  • Wear slip resistant shoes
  • Check all equipment for damage before using 

Three-Point Contact

According to the Infrastructure Health and Safety Association, more than one-quarter of all injuries to equipment operators and truck drivers occur while getting into or out of equipment and trucks. One way to avoid these injuries is to employ the three-point contact rule. 

That means maintaining three points of contact with the truck – two hands and one foot or two feet and one hand - whenever climbing in or out of your vehicle. 

Lifting

Lifting is such an every-day activity that it’s easy to forget how quickly an injury can occur when improperly lifting cargo, but those injuries can significantly affect your workers’ compensation costs. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), lifting heavy objects is one of the leading causes of workplace injuries. Shoulder and back injuries accounted for 36 percent of injuries that resulted in missed work days, and the most significant factors in these injuries were overexertion and cumulative trauma. 

Training your employees on how to lift heavy items correctly can avoid back sprains, wrist and elbow injuries, muscle pulls, spinal injuries, and more. 

OSHA reports that five factors generally contribute to lifting injuries – the weight of the object being lifted, awkward postures, frequent or long-duration lifting, inadequate handholds, and environmental factors. 

Here are some tips from OSHA that address these common factors.

  • Use equipment such as forklifts and duct lifts to lift heavy items
  • Use your legs when lifting objects from a low location
  • Avoid twisting
  • Break down loads into smaller units
  • Rotate tasks, so workers aren’t doing the same activity too long
  • Work in teams
  • Take regular breaks
  • Move materials with inadequate (or no) handholds into containers with good handholds
  • Adjust work schedule to limit exposure to extreme heat or cold temperatures 

Falling Cargo

Loads can shift while in transit, making the simple task of opening a trailer door a potential risk. Improperly secured loads can cause serious injuries and increase your WC costs. 

Here are a few tips to avoid injuries caused by falling cargo:

  • Make sure the load is firmly immobilized or secured on your truck
  • Open one trailer door at a time and stand behind the door as you open it
  • Do not attempt to catch falling cargo 

Training in these four areas and creating a culture where safety is a priority and a work environment where workers feel comfortable reporting injuries will help reduce injuries and lower your workers’ comp insurance costs. 

Save on Workers’ Compensation and Truck Insurance!

To learn additional ways to save on workers compensation and other truck insurance costs, give one of the experienced agents at American Insuring Group a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online. As independent agents, we're free to compare the cost of insurance among lots of companies to ensure you get the best price on all your commercial insurance needs! 

Tags: Workers Compensation Insurance, truck insurance, workers comp costs, Trucking Insurance

Save on Workers Comp Insurance by Complying with OSHA

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Jun 02, 2019

lower-WC-insurance-costs-300.jpgAlthough it often seems as if the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) has a ridiculous number of rules and regulations for business owners, complying with those rules can help lower your workers compensation insurance premiums. 

OSHA’s intention is to protect employees from workplace injuries; therefore, following OSHA’s rules can help create a safer work environment for your employees, which results in fewer injuries and lower WC costs. Plus, not complying with OSHA’s regulations, can result in hefty fines. 

We’re here to help you better understand OSHA and its rules and regulations and to help your business comply with those rules and save on workers’ comp costs

About OSHA 

OSHA, established in 1971, is a government agency that is part of the US Department of Labor. Its primary purpose is “to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.” OSHA’s rules and regulations cover most private sector employers and their workers, along with some public sector workers. 

Since OSHA was established, workplace injuries, illnesses, and deaths have decreased significantly. “Although accurate statistics were not kept at the time, it is estimated that in 1970, around 14,000 workers were killed on the job. That number fell to approximately 4,340 in 2009,” according to OSHA. “At the same time, U.S. employment has almost doubled and now includes over 130 million workers at more than 7.2 million worksites. Since the passage of the OSH Act, the rate of reported serious workplace injuries and illnesses has declined from 11 per 100 workers in 1972 to 3.6 per 100 workers in 2009.” 

Fewer workplace injuries and illnesses not only lower commercial insurance premiums, but they also create healthier workplaces and happier employees. 

OSHA Employer Responsibilities

As an employer, it is your responsibility to provide a safe workplace that is free from OSHA-recognized hazards. Here are three ways to do that:

  • Use color codes, posters, labels, or signs to warn employees of potential hazards.
  • Establish and update operating procedures and safety training, and make sure your employees understand them.
  • Ensure that employees have safe tools and equipment that is properly maintained.

It is also your responsibility to follow OSHA requirements, which include the following:

  • Post the OSHA poster that informs employees of their rights and responsibilities in a prominent location.
  • Report all work-related injuries to the nearest OSHA office within eight hours.
  • Keep records of all work-related injuries and illnesses and ensure that employees and their representatives can easily obtain employee medical records.
  • Post and correct cited OSHA violations.

OSHA also encourages all employers to adopt an Injury and Illness Prevention Program. Click here to learn more about your OSHA responsibilities. 

Honoring your OSHA responsibilities and instituting safety programs will create a safer work environment, minimize injuries, and help lower your WC Insurance. 

Employee Complaints

There are two main types of complaints employees can file with OSHA against your company as his or her employer:

  • Safety and health complaint

    If an employee believes their work environment is unsafe or detrimental to their health, they can file a confidential report with OSHA requesting an inspection of their workplace.
  • Protection from retaliation complaint

    If an employee who submits a complaint to OSHA feels they have been retaliated against, they can file this type of complaint with OSHA. 

Your best defense against both of these complaints is to do your best to create a safe work environment, follow OSHA’s rules and regulations, and keep an open line of communication with your employees. 

OSHA Inspections 

OSHA can inspect your worksite for any number of reasons including a complaint from an employee; after a severe injury or illness; a referral of a hazard from another federal, state, or local agency, or individual; or if you’re in a high-hazard industry or have experienced a high rate of injuries. 

Typically, employers are not notified of an impending inspection in advance; however, understanding the process can take some of the stress out of the experience. 

  • Preparation

    Before conducting an inspection, OSHA compliance officers research the inspection history of the worksite.
  • Opening Conference

    The compliance officer will explain why OSHA selected the workplace for inspection and describe the scope of the review, walkaround procedures, employee representation, and employee interviews. Both the employer and employee can have a representative accompany the officer during the inspection.
  • Walkaround

    The compliance officer and the representatives will then walk through the portions of the workplace covered by the inspection, inspecting for OSHA violations and hazards that could lead to employee injury or illness.
  • Closing Conference

    After the walkaround, the compliance officer holds a closing conference with the employer and the employee representatives to discuss their findings.

Understanding OSHA’s rules and regulations can help keep your employees safer, reduce the chance of an inspection and potential fines, and reduce workers’ comp insurance costs. 

Start Saving on Workers Compensation Insurance Today

To learn how your business can save on workers’ compensation and all other commercial insurance costs, call our experienced independent agents at American Insuring Group a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or connect with us online. 

Our independence allows us to compare coverage from competing insurance carriers, so you can be confident of receiving the best deal on the right protection for your business in Philadelphia, Reading, Allentown, and far beyond!

Tags: Workers Compensation Insurance, workers comp, workers comp costs, Commercial Insurance

3 Ways to Ensure the Lowest Price on Restaurant Insurance

Posted by David Ross on Sun, May 26, 2019

Tips to get the best price on restaurant insuranceRestaurant Insurance can be complicated, but an insurance agent who specializes in restaurant insurance can help guide you through the process. Now, it is also essential that you understand some of the basics in order to make informed decisions.

3 Things to Consider Before Contacting an Insurance Agent

1 – What are You Insuring?

This may sound like a simple question; however, restaurant insurance covers many types of businesses including sports bars, nightclubs, pizzerias, coffee shops, fast food restaurants, upscale restaurants, delis, caterers, food trucks and more.

Each of those establishments has unique needs. For example, a bar selling alcohol may need liquor liability insurance; whereas, a fast food restaurant may not. A food truck has some unique risks that a brick-and-mortar restaurant does not.

An experienced agent will ask you many questions to determine your insurance needs. Taking some time in advance to think about what you are insuring and what your potential risks are helps you provide more accurate information, so your agent can ensure that you get the right coverage.

2 - What Types of Insurance do You Need?

Every restaurant is unique, but here are five basic types of insurance that most restaurants need:

  1. Liability Insurance
  2. Property Insurance
  3. Special Coverage Insurance
  4. Workers’ Compensation Insurance
  5. Commercial Automobile Insurance

Liability insurance
Liability insurance helps protect your business if someone – a customer, a vendor, etc. - sues you for bodily injury or property damage. This insurance covers legal fees and legal payouts when needed. In addition to general liability insurance, which is recommended for most businesses, there is also liability insurance that applies to specific needs such as liquor liability and product liability. 

Property insurance
Property insurance helps protect the things you own such as buildings, restaurant equipment, and even the food in your freezers. Property Insurance typically covers damage caused by fire, smoke, wind, hail, lightning, theft and more. If you rent a space or have a mortgage on the property, property insurance is usually required by the lender or the property owner.

Special Coverage Insurance
Special Coverage Insurance helps protect items that are special or unique. Specialty Insurance may cover lost income if your restaurant is forced to shut down, equipment breakdowns, employee theft, forgery, and more.

Workers’ Compensation Insurance
Workers’ Compensation (WC) helps protect both you and your employees if they are injured on the job. It covers the injured employee’s medical expenses and lost wages, and it helps protect the restaurant if the employee sues the restaurant. WC is mandated by the government for most restaurants with employees.

Commercial Vehicle Insurance
Commercial Vehicle Insurance helps protect vehicles – trucks, vans, automobiles - owned, leased, or rented by your restaurant. This includes food trucks, vehicles used to deliver food, etc. Typical coverage under commercial vehicle insurance includes bodily injury and property damage liability, personal injury protection, and physical damage to your vehicle. 

3 - What Affects the Cost of Your Insurance Premiums?

Many factors go into determining the cost of your insurance premiums, and different insurance companies place emphasis on different factors, which is why using an independent insurance agency like American Insuring Group is always the best way to go. We check the cost of your insurance with several different companies.

Here are a few factors insurance companies use to determine the cost of your insurance premiums:

  • Type of property
  • Loss history
  • Years in business
  • Type of activities (ID checkers, delivery, alcohol service, entertainment, etc.)
  • Hours of operation
  • Size (property size, payroll, sales, etc.)

Get the Best Price on the Right Insurance for Your Restaurant

American Insuring Group specializes in restaurant insurance. We have relationships with several insurance companies, so we can compare prices to ensure that your business is protected at the lowest price. Give American Insuring Group a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or find us online.

Tags: Restaurant Insurance, Commercial Insurance, Restaurant Insurance Costs

Opioid Addiction Dangers for Construction Workers

Posted by David Ross on Sun, May 19, 2019

Opioid addiction dangers for the construction industry and impact on workers comp insurance costsIt’s difficult to pick up a newspaper these days and not see an article about the opioid epidemic plaguing Americans.

It is a serious issue that is costing businesses millions of dollars every year.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), more than 700,000 people died from a drug overdose from 1999 to 2017, and about 68% of the deaths that occurred in 2017 involved an opioid. The number of deaths caused by opioid overdose – both prescription and illegal – was six times higher than in 1999.

Impact on the Construction Industry 

The construction industry is not immune to this epidemic – in fact, it is hit harder than most. The very nature of the industry makes construction workers more vulnerable to opioid abuse than workers in other occupations. In 2016, 73% of injured construction workerswere prescribed a narcotic painkiller. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, construction workers suffer from substance use disorders at nearly twice the rate of the general population.

7 x More Likely to Die from Opioids?

One study found that construction workers in Ohio were seven times more likely to die from an overdose of opioids than workers in other professions. Another study found that construction workers in Barnstable County in Massachusetts accounted for 25% of all fatal overdoses from the prescription painkillers heroin and fentanyl.  

Higher Workers Comp Insurance Costs

This creates higher workers compensation (WC) losses, and WC insurance costs for construction employees are more than double the average cost for other occupations, according to the Center for Construction Research and Training. Narcotics such as opioids account for 29 percent of prescription costs in workers compensation, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH).

Why is Opioid Addiction Hitting the Construction Industry so Hard?

If you think about it, it is not a surprise that employees in the construction industry have been hit hard by the opioid epidemic. Here’s why:

  • Construction is a dangerous job prone to injuries like sprains, ligament tears, and pulled muscles, which leads to pain and the prescription of opioids to ease the pain.

  • The average age of construction workers in the U.S. is 41. In Pennsylvania, it’s 44. As we age, our bodies don’t heal as quickly as they did when we were in our 20’s.

  • Most construction workers don’t get paid if they don’t work, so many are willing to do what they need to work through the pain.

  • People in their late 30s and early 40s often have families to support, which means they need to work – whether they’re in pain or not. Medication can help ease the pain and allow them to continue to work and to support their families.

  • NIOSH found that adults over the age of 40 are more likely to use prescription opioids than adults 20 to 39.

  • Repeated opioid usage creates a cycle of abuse. In other words, when an employee is injured he or she may change their gait or how they carry materials, which can lead to a second injury. Research shows that a worker who has pain in three or more areas is more likely to become addicted to painkillers.

  • Prescription opioids are often readily available on construction worksites and shared among workers.

  • The stigma around addiction makes it difficult for workers to admit there is a problem

What Can You do as an Employer?

You can help minimize opioid addiction among your workers: 

  • Improve worksite safety to minimize injuries and the need for opioids.

  • Pay attention to your workers’ compensation medical provider network. Some networks limit opioid refills or prohibit physicians from dispensing narcotics leaving that to pharmacists. Some networks control how prescription drugs are reduced.

  • Educate your employees about how opioids work, their potency, drug interactions, and how they can become addictive.

  • Recognize the signs of addiction such as multiple injuries, doctor shopping, or physicians dispensing medications.

  • Provide a strong return-to-work program for injured employees, so they can return to work without provoking another injury.

  • Provide emotional support to injured employees.

  • Let your employees know treatment options such as counseling and pharmaceutical treatment.

The Human Toll

The human cost of this epidemic is astounding, but the financial loss to construction companies is also a concern. In an industry where workers’ compensation costs are already higher than average, adding in the problems associated with opioid addiction can put a real strain on your bottom line.

 

Cut Your Workers Comp and Contractor Insurance Cost – Contact Us Today!

Want to learn more about saving on your insurance costs? Give American Insuring Group a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or contact us online.

We specialize in construction and contractor insurance and are aware of the unique challenges you face, including the cost of workers compensation insurance. We'll help you save a bundle while obtaining the quality coverage you need to be well protected!

Tags: Workers Compensation Insurance, Construction Insurance, Contractor Insurance, Opioid Epidemic

How to Handle a Catastrophic Workers Compensation Claim

Posted by David Ross on Sun, May 12, 2019

How to handle a major workers compensation insurance claim in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Erie, PA and elsewhere.It’s vital that any worker injury and subsequent workers compensation insurance claim is handled with care to ensure the well-being of the worker and the business. When it comes to more severe injuries and catastrophic claims, the stakes are even higher.

A catastrophic workers comp claim that is mishandled could end up costing millions of dollars. Proper handling ensures the best outcome for the injured employee and his or her family, the employer, and the payers.

The employer’s first step is to ensure that the injured employee receives the right treatment as quickly as possible. There should be a plan in place to handle any workplace injury including catastrophic injuries. The welfare of the injured employee should be paramount at this point.

3 Things to Keep in Mind:

1 - Show Compassion and Build Trust

Any injury can be scary for an injured employee and their family, but a catastrophic injury carries with it many additional fears and stress factors. The injured employee will likely have thoughts about whether or not they’ll be able to work again, how they’ll support their family, and how will the injury affect the rest of their life.

Meanwhile, in addition to worrying about their injured loved one, family members are likely thinking about how they’re going to pay the medical bills, take care of the injured person when they get home, and how they are going to juggle everything – work, kids, etc.

Someone from the company should visit the injured employee in the hospital. This provides a chance to express concern, get and give information, ensure the employee and family understand the process, get a feel for the employee’s attitude, and discover the extent of the injury and the prognosis.

Try to put yourself in their shoes and understand what they might be going through. It’s essential that you show that you care and that you try to build trust with the employee and his or her family. If you want to have the best outcome and help prevent litigation, show them that you are not the enemy, but that you are working with them toward the same goals.

2 - Determine the Cause of the Accident

It’s always vital to determine the cause of an injury, especially in a severe injury. Did a machine malfunction? Was it a lack of training? Is it a guarding issue? The answer to this question will help determine how the claim is handled.

For example, if the injury was caused by a machine malfunctioning, the employer may seek money through subrogation – pursuing a third-party that caused an insurance loss.

3 - Thoroughly Investigate the Injury

The only way to determine a cause is with a thorough investigation that determines what happened, how, when, where, and why. That includes talking to the injured employee, taking witness statements, reviewing video, and examining the site where the injury occurred.

In the case of a catastrophic workers compensation insurance claim, it’s a good idea to think of the site of the injury as a crime scene. Although crime may not have been committed, it’s essential to preserve the scene to help determine the cause.

All evidence surrounding the accident should be preserved until the investigation is complete. That means roping off the area and keeping employees away. Also, regardless of how gruesome the scene may be, do not attempt to clean it up until the claims adjusters and any other professionals have a chance to examine the area.

The claims adjuster will need to bring in additional experts such as a nurse case manager, medical advisor(s), safety experts, and home health experts.

Bottom Line

Mishandling of any workers’ compensation claim is a problem, and those problems are magnified when it comes to catastrophic claims.

 

Do You Have the Right Workers Comp Insurance Protection?

To learn more about workers compensation insurance, and to make sure you are properly covered, give the experienced independent agents at the American Insuring Group a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or find us online. We’ll make sure you’re properly covered, AND we’ll help you get a great price too!

Tags: Workers Compensation Insurance, Commercial Insurance

8 Practical Insurance Tips for Small Business Owners

Posted by David Ross on Sun, May 05, 2019

Contact Us for Commercial Insurance for Business Owners Wearing Multiple HatsAs a business owner, you wear many hats, and sometimes all of the responsibilities can seem overwhelming.

The good news is that you don’t have to be an expert on everything – accounting, marketing, insurance, etc. Finding a trusted professional in many of these areas helps ensure the success of your business… not to mention your sanity.

Your commercial insurance protection is one of those areas. It’s something you need to protect your assets, your employees, and your business, and a good insurance agent can guide you through the process.

 

Here are 8 practical insurance tips for small business owners from the experienced agents at American Insuring Group:

1 - Consider What Assets You Need to Protect

Sit down and make a list of all the assets you want to protect. The obvious assets are buildings, computers, vehicles, furniture, and inventory that you own. But other things to consider are things you lease and customer goods that are in your care.

2 - Don’t Forget Intangibles

Sometimes you need to protect things that are less tangible than buildings and furniture such as your income, your reputation, your customers, and your employees. This is where insurances such as workers’ compensation, key person life insurance, and business interruption come into play 

Then there is the area of liability that has the potential to destroy your business if you don’t protect it adequately. We live in a very litigious society, and your liability can be unlimited, so taking the highest limit you can afford is often the best approach.

The risk is different for every business, but here are some types of liability insurance:

  • General liability
  • Builders Risk Insurance for contractors
  • Inland Marine Insurance
  • Errors and Omissions or Professional Liability Insurance
  • Liquor Liability Insurance

3 - Identify your Insurance Responsibilities

Sometimes a third party – such as a client, lender, or landlord - may require that you have certain types of insurance. Ask for any insurance requirements from these individuals in writing.

4 - Understand the Difference between Actual Cash Value (ACV) and Replacement Value

On paper, assets depreciate, but often the value of an asset to a business doesn’t change, so you need to understand the difference between actual cash value and replacement value.

For example, let’s say you bought a truck for $50,000 to deliver your product. Each year, the value of that truck will depreciate. After five or ten years, that truck would be worth a lot less than $50,000. 

However, if that truck is totaled in an accident five or ten years later, you are going to need to replace it, so you can continue to deliver your product. If you’ve insured the vehicle at the depreciated value, you may not be able to replace it. The value of that truck to your business (getting the product to your customers) is much higher than the depreciated value of the truck.

To avoid this problem, insure your assets for what it would cost you to replace it – replacement cost.

5 - Look for Ways to Save Money without Affecting Coverage

One of the simplest ways to save money on insurance is to increase your deductibles. Just make sure that you have the available cash to pay the higher deductible if you have to make a claim.

Check if you qualify for a business-owners policy, which offers discounts and often includes additional coverage. Ask about an umbrella policy if you think you need higher liability limits.

Work with an independent agent who can check the rates with several different insurance companies rather than being locked into just one. 

6 - Find an Experienced, Professional Insurance Agent

Find an agent that specializes in your industry – such as commercial insurance, truck insurance, and contractors insurance. Look for agents that are willing to talk to you about your concerns and answer your questions.  Look for professional credentials such as CPCU, CIC, or CLU.

7 - Get Everything in Writing

When looking for the best insurance coverage for your business, ask for a written proposal and consider alternatives. Take the time to carefully read your insurance policy looking at conditions, exclusions, and limitations of your policy to ensure that there aren’t any gaps, and ask your agent questions.

8 - Review Your Policy Annually

Things change – you buy a new truck, you sell an asset, etc., so it’s vital that you review your policy regularly to ensure that you continue to have the right coverage at the best price.

 

The Best Tip of All – Let Us Help You Get Properly Covered!

Contact us when buying Commercial InsuranceAs a business owner or manager, you have enough to worry about – employees, sales, and the list goes on.

Turn to the experienced independent agents at American Insuring Group to help you navigate the process. We'll work with you to ensure that you have the right coverage at the best price because as independents we’re free to shop competing providers (unlike those single-brand competitors of ours!).

So call us at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or find us online.

Tags: Small Business Insurance, Commercial Insurance

Is Your Restaurant Sign Insured?

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Apr 28, 2019

Insurance for Commercial Signs Including RestaurantsHave you checked your restaurant insurance policy to see if your signage is covered?

What is one of the things almost every restaurant needs to attract new customers – besides great food and friendly service? The answer: a sign! You need to let people know where you are so that they can find you. Signage can even help someone discover your existence when driving by.

But what happens if that sign is damaged? What if a truck knocks it over, it gets vandalized, or it’s struck by lightning? You will need to repair or replace the sign if you want to continue attracting customers. Will your insurance cover the cost of repairing or replacing that sign? The answer: maybe.

You have a lot of things on your plate as a restaurant owner – menus, pricing, advertising, and the list goes on – so it’s easy to forget about some of the seemingly small things. An experienced insurance agent – one who specializes in restaurant insurance – can help make sure you don’t miss any of those “small” things!

Covered or Not?

Getting back to our question and the resulting ambiguous answer – “maybe.” You need to know the definitive answer to that question – “Will your insurance cover the cost of repairing or replacing that sign?” - BEFORE something happens to it.

Each policy is different, and rules can vary from state to state, but generally speaking, if your sign is permanently attached to a building that you own, you can add the value of the sign to the building coverage on your Business Owner’s Policy (BOP).

However, a large number of restaurant owners lease the building for their restaurant rather than own the building. Those business owners need to look at other options.

Tenant’s Betterment and Improvements Insurance

The International Risk Management Institute (IRMI) defines tenant’s betterment and improvements as “permanent additions or changes made to a building by a lessee at his or her own expense that may not legally be removed.” This includes additions or modifications the lessee makes that increase the value of the structure such as upgraded cabling for computers or TVs, lighting fixtures, wall-to-wall carpeting, and signs that are attached to the building.

If these improvements were to be damaged or destroyed and are no longer useable, it would be detrimental to your restaurant.

There is insurance available to cover betterments and improvements. Sometimes the property owner will add it to their commercial property insurance; however, they can also ask that it is excluded from their policy. Therefore, it’s vital that you carefully review your lease to determine who is responsible for covering any damage to the improvements you make.

You may find an insurance company that wants to add your improvements and betterments coverage to your contents coverage. Keep in mind the rate for building coverage is usually lower than it is for content coverage and often broader in the scope of what is covered. 

Insurance for Freestanding Signs 

What if you have a sign for your restaurant that is not attached to the building? In that case, you will need specific protection added to your BOP to cover any damage to the sign. And if you have more than one free-standing sign, each one needs to be listed on your policy along with a specific limit of coverage for each.

We’ll Make Sure You’re Covered for the Big and Little Things!

Sometimes it’s the “little” things that end up costing your restaurant a lot of money. As restaurant insurance specialists, American Insuring Group’s independent agents can make sure you don’t miss any of the “little” things, not to mention the big things as well! We’ll help you get great coverage at a surprisingly affordable rate.

Give us a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or contact us online.

Tags: Restaurant Insurance, Commercial Insurance, Commercial Sign Insurance

3 Heavy Equipment Safety Tips (for Lower Insurance Costs)

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Apr 14, 2019
Heavy Equipment Contractor Insurance Safety TipsImagine trying to complete a major construction project without the use of heavy equipment like cranes and backhoes. You probably can’t. Almost every construction site includes at least a few pieces of heavy equipment to help complete the job.

Heavy equipment is one of the biggest hazards for construction workers and it causes hundreds of injuries and deaths every year, thereby increasing contractor insurance costs and affecting employee productivity and morale.

A Leading Cause of Fatalities

According to the Work Safe Center, “machine-related injuries ranked second after motor vehicle-related injuries among the leading causes of occupational injury fatalities.” Construction workers and heavy equipment operators accounted for 63% of heavy equipment and truck-related deaths. Half the deaths involved backhoes and trucks.

Rollovers accounted for the most deaths for heavy equipment operators. The most significant cause of death for workers on foot and maintenance workers is being struck by heavy equipment or trucks. Being caught in or between was also a common cause of injuries for people working on or near heavy equipment.

3 Tips to Help You Focus on Safety

A focus on worksite safety can help protect your employees, your business, and your bottom line. Here are three heavy equipment safety tips to decrease injuries and deaths and decrease insurance costs.

1 - Training

OSHA requires that anyone operating heavy equipment be thoroughly trained on how to properly and safely operate heavy equipment. This training should be a combination of hands-on and classroom instruction and should include how to identify hazards, safety features on the equipment, load capacity, how to get in and out of equipment safely, and how to safely maneuver the equipment.

And training should be ongoing.

2 - Awareness

Unfortunately, the very prevalence of heavy equipment on job sites often causes workers to become complacent, but it’s crucial that anyone operating or working around heavy equipment be mindful of what is going on around them. That includes overhead power lines (which should be deenergized if possible) and underground sewer, water, gas, and electric.

Heavy equipment operators should be aware of the swing radius of the equipment they’re operating to avoid hitting people and other equipment, especially when working in tight spaces.

Whenever possible, the area where heavy equipment is being used should be cordoned off, and workers should always try to stay away from areas where heavy equipment is being operated. If that isn’t possible, use a spotter and a radio to keep blind spots clear.

3 - Use Equipment Properly

Before operating any heavy equipment, workers should visually inspect the equipment to make sure it is in good operating condition including tires and tracks, fluid levels, hydraulic hoses, buckets, booms, and any attachments. Make sure lights, gauges, horns, and alarms are working, and that arms, buckets, shovels, etc. can fully extend. If the cab rotates, make sure it does so correctly in all directions. Workers should never use equipment that doesn’t operate correctly or appears to be damaged.

Equipment should only be used for the task it was designed for, and operators should be aware of the payload and lift capacity of the equipment and not overwork it.

Workers should know how to enter and exit equipment. Similar to climbing a ladder, operators should not carry anything as they climb onto equipment and should maintain three points of contact. Before entering or exiting equipment, make sure it is completely shut off, the parking brake is engaged, and pressure is released from hydraulic controls. Workers should never enter or exit equipment while it is in operation or while it is moving.

And finally, there is a reason the equipment is equipped with a seatbelt. If a piece of heavy equipment tips or rolls over, the seatbelt could save a life. One of the worst things a worker can do if the equipment begins to tip or rollover is to jump out of it even though that may be their first instinct. Staying inside with your seatbelt on is your safest option.

The Right Insurance – Your Last Line of Defense

Save on PA Contractors Insurance in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Berks County and more.Preventing workplace injuries and deaths should always be your first line of defense. Unfortunately, sometimes despite all of your efforts, accidents do happen. That’s where the right insurance can help protect you and your employees!

Give American Insuring Group a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or find us online.

We’re experts in contractor insurance. We know the risks you face and offer affordable rates on contractor insurance by analyzing the plans and comparing insurance costs from many competing insurance carriers!

The result? You get quality contactor insurance at the best rate possible. Contact us today to learn more!

Tags: Construction Insurance, Contractor Insurance, Commercial Insurance

5 Factors Impacting Commercial Truck Insurance Cost

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Apr 07, 2019

Truck Insurance Cost Factors in PennsylvaniaTruck drivers face many things they can’t control as they drive from point A to point B delivering their cargo – inclement weather, traffic, road construction, distracted drivers, and the list goes on.

It’s good to know that there is one thing that truck drivers do have some control over, and that is their trucking insurance costs!

Small businesses and owner-operators offering trucking services invest in commercial truck insurance to protect their investment from all those things they can’t control. There are many different types of commercial truck insurance such as trailer interchange insurance, cargo insurance, and more.

The First Step

There are several factors that go into determining your insurance premiums. Each insurance company weighs each of those factors differently. Your first step to controlling your commercial truck insurance premiums is to work with a good insurance agent who specializes in truck insurance, knows what questions to ask, understands your risks, and can compare costs among competing insurance companies in order to keep your costs low.

Here are 5 Factors that Affect the Cost of Your Commercial Truck Insurance, and Ways to Lower Your Premiums:


1- Previous Claims History

If you or your company have a history of high claims rates, there’s a good chance that you’ll make multiple claims in the future. Insurance companies offer lower premiums to companies that have fewer claims.

SOLUTION:
Lower the number of accidents and claims by creating a culture of safety with ongoing safety training and safety programs for your drivers.

2 - Driving Records

Insurance companies will look at the claim history and driving records of all your drivers. If they see drivers with multiple violations or accidents, you will pay higher insurance premiums.

SOLUTION:
Do thorough background checks on anyone you’re considering hiring and provide ongoing safety training for your drivers.

3 – Policy Structure

Chances are you’re going to need more than one policy to protect all of your investments. Purchasing insurance policies from different insurance companies may appear to save you money, but often bundling multiple policies with one company ends up saving you money.

SOLUTION:
Find an independent agency like American Insuring Group who can compare costs with several companies and analyze the results side-by-side to determine the best solution for your needs.

4 - Vehicles

A truck with a higher price tag will also be more expensive to insure. Larger and heavier vehicles may not be as easy to navigate as smaller vehicles, and in an accident are likely to cause more damage, which will also increase your premium payments.

SOLUTION:
Purchase the right vehicle for the job. Don’t buy a larger or more expensive vehicle than what you need.

5 - Driving Locations

Where you drive can affect the probability of having an accident. You’re less likely to have an accident driving along a stretch of country road with little or no traffic than driving a big city street during rush hour. Also, the further you travel, the higher the chance of an accident. The higher risk of an accident, the higher the insurance premiums.

Request an Annual Truck Insurance Review

Keep in mind that there is nothing more constant in life than change, and that applies in the trucking business as well – new drivers, new vehicles, changing claims rates, etc., so it’s vital to schedule an annual review with your insurance agent if you want to ensure that you have the best coverage at the best price.

Ready to Save on Truck Insurance? Call the Experts at American Insuring Group!

Contact us to save on PA Truck InsuranceAmerican Insuring Group specializes in trucking insurance, and we’re independent agents, so we’ll make sure that your commercial vehicle has the best insurance protection at the lowest price (unlike many of our competitors, we’re not locked into one solution).

So, give us a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or contact us online. Start saving today!

Tags: Commercial Vehicle Insurance, truck insurance, Trucking Insurance

How to Prevent Repeated Workers Comp Insurance Claims

Posted by David Ross on Sun, Mar 31, 2019

Prevent repeated workers comp insurance claimsYou often hear horror stories about fraudulent workers compensation insurance claims, but fortunately, most employees that make WC claims are honest, hard-working individuals.

Occasionally, you’ll run across an employee who seems to be a repeat WC claim offender. Some are legitimate claims, and some are not, but repeated WC claims can be annoying, time-consuming, and costly.

Here are steps you can take to determine if workers are trying to take advantage of the system, and ways to stop them from making repeated false claims or from incurring repeated injuries:

 

1 - Don’t Antagonize - Give Injured Employees the Benefit of the Doubt

Your first step is to remember that both you and the injured employee are human, and as humans, we all have emotions and make errors. Injured employees need to be treated with respect, or you may inadvertently antagonize the employee and make matters worse, or you may be dealing with a worker with a legitimate claim.

For example, an employee who is willing to do whatever it takes to get a job done may do things that increase their risk of injury. An employee may be naturally clumsy, or they may not be aware of the right way to get a job done safely.

If you encounter an employee who has multiple WC claims, you need to investigate it, so you know what steps to take to reduce the number of claims. It’s vital that you go into the investigation with an open mind. Start the investigation by giving the injured employee the benefit of the doubt until or unless you find a reason not to.

2 - Investigate the Injury

Investigations are essential with any WC claim but especially with an employee with repeated claims. Gather statements from the employee, supervisor, any witnesses, and the treating physician, so you can understand the extent of the injury and how the injury occurred. If you don’t think the treating physician is being honest or is not providing the best information or treatment, it’s okay to get a second opinion.

You also need to figure out the actual cause of the accident. A cause may seem obvious but upon a more in-depth inspection may prove to be a secondary cause – or not the cause at all. Review studies conducted on similar injuries; look at all potential factors; consider other factors such as previous injuries and comorbid conditions such as obesity, mental health issues, substance abuse, etc.; consider the validity of testimonies; and with all that information, make a conclusion.

3 - Talk to the Injured Worker

As mentioned earlier, injured workers are human and have emotions. Like everyone, some of those emotions are logical, and some are not. Having an open, non-confrontational conversation with the injured employee can reveal things such as personal challenges at home, psychosocial issues, or problems with a supervisor or with your company.

4 - Take Steps to Avoid Future Claims

Once you understand the reasons for the repeated WC claims – whether they’re legitimate or not – you can take steps to avoid future claims. If it turns out they don’t know how to perform their job safely, provide additional training and education. If you determine that they are physically unable to do their job effectively, consider transferring them to another job that they can perform safely.

However, if they’re trying to take advantage of the system, be respectful, but let them know that you will be watching them and will take appropriate action if abuse of the system is found, up to and including termination.

Protecting Your Bottom Line

Repeated workers’ compensation claims affect your bottom line while potentially harming productivity and employee morale.

You know what else affects your bottom line? Paying more than you need to for workers comp insurance!

To get a GREAT deal on your WC insurance, give the independent agents at American Insuring Group a call at (800) 947-1270 or (610) 775-3848 or find us online. As independent agents, we’re free to shop and compare rates among competing insurance carriers to make sure that you are getting the best WC insurance at the best possible price!

Call or click today to get started.

Tags: Workers Compensation Insurance, workers comp costs, Workers Compensation Insurance Fraud